Corporate Tax 2021

Last Updated March 15, 2021

Greece

Law and Practice

Authors



Zepos & Yannopoulos was established in 1893, and is a leading Greek law firm renowned for its legal acumen and integrity. It offers comprehensive legal and tax services, with a focus on multinational companies and high net worth individuals. The firm’s tax and accounting practice is acknowledged as the largest and most specialised of any law firm in Greece, and offers the full range of tax services on both a transactional and ongoing basis, covering the areas of business tax advisory and compliance, finance and capital markets taxation, international tax and taxation of M&A, real estate taxation, tax controversy and litigation, transfer pricing, VAT, indirect tax and customs.

Businesses in Greece most commonly adopt the forms of:

  • a société anonyme (Ανώνυμη Εταιρεία or ΑΕ),
  • a limited liability company (Εταιρεία Περιορισμένης Ευθύνης or ΕΠΕ); or
  • a private company (Ιδιωτική Κεφαλαιουχική Εταιρεία or ΙΚΕ).

All of these forms of companies are referred to as "capital companies" (κεφαλαιουχικές εταιρείες). One of their features, as opposed to partnerships, is that the liability of their shareholders or members is limited.

Large companies will most commonly take the form of an AE, which unlike the ΕΠΕ and IKE is subject to a minimum capital requirement (EUR25,000 as of 1 January 2019). The popularity of the IKE form for small and medium-sized businesses has risen in recent years, as it offers a more flexible structure compared to an ΕΠΕ.

Small- and medium-sized enterprises engaged in service provision and family businesses often take the form of a general partnership (Ομόρρυθμη Εταιρεία or OE) or limited partnership (Ετερόρρυθμη Εταιρεία or ΕΕ).

Corporations and partnerships alike are taxed as separate legal entities.

In general, business entities are not transparent. Exceptions include Greek Venture Capital Mutual Funds (ΑΚΕΣ) and Greek Alternative Investment Funds (Ο.Ε.Ε.).

The taxation of Greek undertakings for collective investment in transferable securities (ΟΣΕΚΑ) is calculated as a percentage of their net assets, and exhausts the tax liability of the undertaking and its shareholders.

The taxation of Greek real estate investment companies (ΑΕΕΑΠ) is calculated as a percentage of the average of the fair market value of their investments. This tax also exhausts the tax liability of the undertaking and its shareholders.

Subject to the operation of double taxation treaties, incorporated businesses are deemed to be resident in Greece if:

  • they are formed in accordance with Greek law;
  • their registered seat is in Greece; or
  • the place of their effective management is in Greece.

The place of effective management is determined on the basis of facts and circumstances, with particular consideration being given to the places where:

  • day-to-day business is undertaken;
  • strategic decisions are adopted;
  • annual shareholders’, board of directors and other executive meetings are held;
  • books and records are kept; and
  • the directors’ place of residence.

The place of residence of the majority shareholders may potentially be considered. The rules on residence do not apply to certain companies operating under special shipping regimes.

From fiscal year (FY) 2019 onwards, the ordinary income tax rate of 24% is applicable to:

  • businesses incorporated in the form of an AE, ΕΠΕ or IKE;
  • partnerships in the form of an OE or EE; and
  • all other legal persons and entities defined in the Income Tax Code, including local permanent establishments of non-resident entities.

This does not apply for credit institutions that have opted to apply a scheme available for enhancing capital adequacy, converting deferred tax assets into deferred tax credits against the Greek State, which are taxed at a rate of 29%.

Business income of individuals who are directly engaged in a business forms part of their taxable basis, including any salary and pension income, and is taxed at a progressive scale ranging from 9% to 44%.

Reduced tax rates are available to companies formed as ΑΕs or ΕΠΕs on certain non-taxed profit reserves formed under growth incentive laws if converted into share capital. Prerequisites for this include, in certain cases, restrictions to ensure the continuity of the relevant company and the preservation of capital.

The taxable profits of incorporated businesses are based on accounting profits, subject to the special rules and classifications provided for in the income tax legislation. In general, taxable profits equate to the aggregate of revenues after subtracting business deductible expenses, depreciation allowed for tax purposes and certain provisions for bad debts.

Additionally, all business expenses, in order to be deductible, must have:

  • been actually incurred;
  • been incurred for business; and
  • been properly recorded in the books and supported by adequate documentation.

Non-deductible Expenses

Categories of business expenses that are not deductible are explicitly defined, and include:

  • provisions (except specifically allowed bad debt provisions);
  • penalties and fines;
  • payments for goods or services exceeding EUR500 if not effected through banking transactions;
  • unpaid social security contributions;
  • payments to persons resident in the jurisdictions deemed non-co-operative or preferential unless the taxpayer proves that there is no tax avoidance or evasion; and; and
  • certain other types of expenses.

Payments to EU and EEA residents that are deemed to be preferential are deductible in principle. Specific limitations apply to the deduction of interest. Expenses related to participations yielding tax-exempt dividends and capital gains are not tax deductible in principle.

Taxable Profits

As a general rule, the profits of incorporated businesses are taxed on an accruals basis.

Any profits that are distributed or capitalised without having previously been taxed are subject to tax upon such distribution or capitalisation.

R&D Expenses and Patents

Subject to a governmental or simplified audit procedure, a supertax deduction of an additional percentage of certain R&D expenses, including any depreciation of machinery and equipment used for R&D purposes, is available at the time such expenses are realised. This was initially 30% and increased to 100% as of 1 September 2020.

Profits derived by a business from the sale of assets produced by deploying its own patents, and from services provided with the use of its own patents, are exempt from corporate income tax for a period of three years, starting from the year when the relevant revenues were first accrued. The relevant profits are taxed when they are distributed or capitalised.

Certain instruments and equipment used for R&D that are set by governmental decision can be amortised at a 40% rate annually.

Special Regime of Law 89/1967

The cost-plus regime of Law 89/1967, providing a special framework for the establishment in Greece of shared-services centres rendering certain services specified in the law to associated companies, has recently been expanded to include within its scope software development, IT support, data management and storage and computer-based call centres. The regime provides for the full deductibility of business expenses, which concur to form the taxable gross revenues for income tax purposes after addition of a profit mark-up, which cannot be inferior to 5% and which is acknowledged in advance by the tax authorities. Eligibility under the regime presupposes annual expenditures of at least EUR100,000 and employment of at least four persons (one of whom can be part-time).

The current EU-compliant framework for the establishment of private investment aid schemes for a country’s regional and economic development includes state grants in the form of tax exemptions for eligible investments.

EU-compliant tax incentives for the production of audiovisual content, the provision of ancillary services and the development of source code for computer game software provide for a 30% deduction of eligible expenses, incurred in Greece, from taxable income.

Incentives for the creation of new jobs are also available and consist, subject to a maximum limit specified in the law, of a 50% super deduction for the relevant social security contributions payable by employers.

Specific tax incentives, such as exemption from real estate transfer tax, are available to entities that acquire property and commence activities in special industrial zones and entrepreneur parks.

Green Incentives

Incentives for sustainable development include a 130% super-deduction for expenses related to environmental protection, ie, in relation to zero or low emission vehicles or public transportation season tickets. Explicit deductibility for corporate income tax purposes of expenses related to CSR activities has also been introduced as an incentive for sustainable development.

Strategic Investments

During 2019, new legislation was introduced with the aim of streamlining the existing framework for attracting strategic investments in all sectors of the Greek economy through the grant of incentives. The rules define strategic investments as those which are capable of producing material quantitative and qualitative results towards expanding employment, reconstructing production and enhancing the country’s natural and cultural environment. Accordingly, such investments will be approved by a governmental committee if they meet certain criteria, eg, for investments within certain industrial zones, having a budget in excess of EUR25 million and creating at least 50 new jobs.

Strategic investments would mostly embrace extroversion, innovation, competitiveness, comprehensive planning, the preservation of natural resources in the context of the circular economy and high added value, notably in the business sectors of international trade and services. The tax incentives offered by are:

  • the stabilisation of the tax rate for 12 years;
  • scalable tax incentives such as tax exemptions for certain categories of investments exceeding certain thresholds;
  • accelerated depreciation; and
  • beneficial taxation for expatriate executives.

Shipping Tax Regime

A tonnage tax regime applies in respect of ship-owning companies as well as companies chartering bare vessels (bareboat charterers) or companies leasing vessels (ship lessees) under a foreign flag. The tax is calculated on the basis of the capacity and age of the vessels. In relation to specified types of vessels under the Greek flag, the tonnage tax exhausts any further income tax obligation of the ship-owning company, bareboat charterer or ship lessee as well as such entities’ shareholders with respect to income arising from the operation and exploitation of the vessels.

With respect to vessels under foreign flags, tonnage tax is imposed only in relation to those vessels that are managed in Greece by companies that have established offices in Greece for such management, under a specially regulated regime. Under this regime, the income of such management companies is exempt from tax. In addition, vessels flying flags of EU or EEA member states can also be subject to the tonnage tax regime in respect of defined types of vessels, regardless of the place of management.

Greek companies and foreign companies that have established an office in Greece under the aforementioned special regime and engage in activities other than the management of vessels, such as chartering, insurance and damage settlement, in respect of ships under the Greek or a foreign flag of total tonnage over 500 shipping tons, are subject to an annual contribution calculated on the basis of the amount of foreign exchange that is required by law to be imported into Greece annually in order to cover their operating expenses.

Family Offices

A recently introduced regime offers tax incentives for the establishment in Greece of family offices managing and administering the wealth and assets of Greek tax resident individuals and their families. Qualifying family offices should incur annual expenditure of at least EUR1 million and should employ at least fiv employees. The taxable gross revenues of family offices are determined by adding a 7% profit mark-up on all costs incurred, thereby ensuring the full tax deductibility of the relevant costs. Services provided between the family office and its members shall fall outside the scope of VAT.

Tax losses incurred due to the conduct of a business within a certain fiscal year can be carried forward to be offset against profits made over the next five consecutive years. Previously untaxed profits that are taxed as a result of their distribution or capitalisation cannot be offset against tax losses incurred in the relevant year. Special rules apply for the amortisation of losses arising from an exchange of bonds under the Greek PSI programme, as well as in respect of banks, financial leasing and factoring companies from specified debt write-offs and disposals of loans and credits.

Τax losses incurred abroad can neither be used to determine taxable profit in the same fiscal year nor carried forward, with the exception of final tax losses arising from the conduct of business through permanent establishments in EU/EEA member states, provided that the relevant profits are not exempt from Greek income tax by virtue of a double taxation treaty between Greece and the relevant EU or EEA member state.

According to a recent rule transposing part of the EU Anti-Tax Avoidance Directive into Greek domestic law, subject to a de minimis threshold of EUR3 million annually, “exceeding borrowing costs” are not deductible by local corporations and local permanent establishments of non-resident entities to the extent that they exceed 30% of EBITDA, with a possibility to carry forward the non-deductible portion without any time limitation. “Exceeding borrowing costs" is defined as the amount by which the otherwise deductible borrowing costs of a company exceed taxable interest revenue and other economically equivalent taxable revenue. This limitation does not apply to several types of financial undertakings, such as credit institutions, insurance companies, and specific institutions for occupational retirement. Regarding related-party transactions, this rule is applied after any transfer pricing adjustment.

Another restriction on the deduction of interest is that the portion of interest expenses corresponding to any rate exceeding the interest rate for credit lines to non-financial corporations referred to in the most recent Bulletin of Conjunctural Indicators of the Bank of Greece (as at the time of the loan) is not deductible. This limitation does not apply to interest on bank loans or bond loans, nor to interest paid to related parties.

There is no consolidated tax grouping regime in Greece.

Capital gains from the disposal of assets including shares in other corporations are fully included in the taxable basis of corporations for income tax purposes in the fiscal year in which they are realised.

As per a recent amendment to the Income Tax Code, Greek legal persons are exempt from tax on capital gains arising from the disposal of shares in EU Parent-Subsidiary Directive-qualifying subsidiaries (see 6.3 Taxation on Dividends from Foreign Subsidiaries) insofar as they hold at least 10% participation in those subsidiaries for a minimum holding period of 24 months. The provision shall apply for income generated from 1 July 2020 onwards.

Under a grandfather clause, losses arising from the transfer of shares realised until 31 December 2022 shall be deductible for tax purposes after 1 January 2020 to the extent that losses had been reflected in financial statement valuations having occurred until 31 December 2019.

Capital gains derived from certain qualifying corporate reorganisations, such as mergers, divisions, partial divisions, transfers of assets and exchanges of shares, are exempt from tax at the time of the relevant operation, subject to specific anti-abuse rules.

Value-Added Tax

Value-added tax is levied on virtually all transactions relating to goods and services. The standard VAT rate is 24%, although reduced rates are also available in certain cases (eg, for certain agricultural supplies, hotel accommodation, certain social services, etc). VAT is imposed on the total consideration received for the supply of goods or services, excluding the tax itself. VAT is not a burden for companies with the right to fully deduct input VAT.

Stamp Tax

Stamp tax is levied on documents issued or executed in Greece in respect of certain transactions that are not subject to VAT.

The most common transactions that are subject to stamp tax are certain commercial leases, certain loans and transfers of ongoing business concerns.

Stamp tax is applied at different rates depending on the type of parties to a transaction. Business transactions falling under the scope of stamp tax are, in principle, subject to a 2.4% rate applied on their value. The rate for commercial leases is 3.6%.

Real Estate Transfer Tax and VAT Treatment

The transfer of real estate is subject to real estate transfer tax, which is imposed on a value imputed for tax purposes (either "objective value" or the actual transfer value agreed, whichever is higher) and is borne by the purchaser: the tax rate is 3%. An additional 3% municipality tax is applied on the amount of the real estate tax, so that the overall tax burden adds up to 3.09%. Reduced rates of real estate transfer tax apply in certain corporate reorganisations, such as mergers.

Between 2020-22, the sale by constructors of buildings that would normally be subject to 24% VAT shall be exempt from VAT, upon the filing of a relevant application. The exemption shall cover buildings that have been completed with building permits following 1 January 2006, as well as those that will be built within the aforementioned three-year period. The constructor will waive the right to deduct the VAT on the construction cost, and any VAT already deducted or refunded should be refunded to the State, through the filing by the constructor of an extra-ordinary VAT return, at the time of the sale of the building. Any non-recoverable VAT can be deducted as an expense for income tax purposes.

Listed Shares Sales Tax

A transfer tax at the rate of 0.2% is levied on sales and stock lending in respect of listed shares.

Banking Levy

An annual banking levy, Law 128 contribution, applies on loans and credits granted by Greek and foreign credit and financial institutions. The applicable rates depend on the type of credit, and range between 0.12% and 0.6%.

Unified Real Estate Tax

Incorporated businesses owning property rights on real estate located in Greece are subject to a unified real estate tax (Ενιαίος Φόρος Ιδιοκτησίας Ακινήτων), commonly referred to as ENFIA, which consists of a main and a supplementary tax. The main tax applies to each property separately and is computed based on a formula that varies depending on the type and location of the real estate assets and a number of other parameters set in the law. The basis rate for the main tax (which is then multiplied by set coefficients depending on the particular case) ranges from EUR0.001 to EUR13 per square metre, depending on the type of property.

The supplementary standard tax rate is set at 0.55%, with properties that are used by the taxpayer for its business activities being subject to a supplementary tax of 0.1%. A number of exemptions from the tax or reduced rates are available for specific categories of properties and/or taxpayers (eg, real estate investment companies).

Special Real Estate Tax

A special real estate tax (Ειδικός Φόρος Ακινήτων) imposed on real estate owned as of 1 January of each calendar year at a rate of 15% of the value of the real estate imputed for tax purposes is imposed for the purposes of tackling the ownership of Greek real estate by non-transparent structures. It is, in practice, not applicable to a great number of incorporated businesses owning Greek real estate, based on a number of exemptions. Recent amendments to the Special Real Estate Tax legislation harmonise the regulated investment vehicle exemption with the domestic and EU legislation that applies to relevant schemes.

Capital Accumulation Tax

A special tax is imposed on capital accumulation (φόρος συγκέντρωσης κεφαλαίων), at a rate of 1%. This applies on capital in cash or in kind contributed to legal entities of any form in the context of a capital increase. Such tax is not imposed on the capital accumulated upon the establishment of an entity. A duty of 0.1% on share capital is additionally imposed on companies taking the form of an AE in favour of the Greek Competition Committee.

Municipal Taxes and Taxes in favour of Third Parties

Depending on the precise form of their activity, corporations may be liable to various municipal taxes/duties, such as cleaning, lighting and advertising duties.

A property duty is levied by each municipality at a rate ranging between 0.025% and 0.035% on the objective value of immovable property located in the territory of the relevant municipality.

A number of taxes in favour of third parties, such as the Lawyers’ Pension Fund, universities, other funds and non-profit organisations, are applicable to incorporated businesses and other taxpayers, as the case may be.

Closely held local businesses usually operate in corporate forms, as companies with legal personality. Small and medium-sized enterprises and family businesses often take the form of a general partnership (OE) or limited partnership (ΕΕ).

Operation as a sole proprietorship is preferred only for very small-scale businesses.

An individual professional is taxed at progressive tax rates which, depending on the level of the income, may or may not lead to an effective rate that is lower than the combined effective rate of corporate taxation, together with tax imposed on profits distributions, where applicable (see 3.4 Sales of Shares by Individuals in Closely Held Corporations).

There are no tax rules that prevent closely held corporations from accumulating earnings for investment purposes.

Greek tax-resident individuals are subject to 5% income tax on profits and dividends from closely held corporations acquired as of 1 January 2020. Profits of small partnerships (in the form of an OE or EE) keeping single-entry books are taxed only at company level, with no further income taxation on profit distributions at the level of partners. AE, EΠΕ and IKE companies cannot keep single-entry books.

Capital Gains

Capital gains of Greek tax-resident individuals derived from the sale of shares in closely held corporations are subject to 15% income tax. Gains on the sale of shares in closely held corporations are, in certain circumstances, calculated on an imputed manner set in the relevant rules on the basis of the level of the corporation’s equity.

Capital gains realised by employees and shareholders as a result of transferring shares in non-listed start-up companies purchased through the exercise of stock option rights acquired within a period of five years as of the company establishment are subject to 5% capital gains tax on the condition that a minimum period of three years shall have lapsed between the stock options grant and the disposal of the relevant shares. In the case of all other companies except start-ups, employees are subject to 15% capital gains tax on the condition that a minimum period of two years shall have lapsed between the the stock options grant and the disposal of the relevant shares. If minimum holding periods are not met, the relevant benefits are classified and taxed as employment income.

Capital gains are included in the taxable base of individuals for purposes of the application of a "special solidarity" contribution. This was first enacted in 2011 as a temporary measure in the context of Greece’s austerity measures, but has become a permanent feature which has been incorporated into the Income Tax Code. The special solidarity contribution is applied on a progressive scale, with the maximum rate being 10%.

Capital Losses

Capital losses from sales of shares and other securities can be carried forward for five years to be set off against future capital gains deriving from similar transactions only.

Exemptions

Under domestic legislation, foreign tax-resident individuals are exempt from tax on capital gains derived from the sale of shares in Greek companies, provided they are resident in a jurisdiction that has a double taxation treaty with Greece. They can also be exempt from the special solidarity contribution under double taxation treaties.

Withholding Tax

Foreign tax-resident individuals are subject to withholding tax on distributions of dividends and profits from Greek companies, subject to relief or reduced rates under double taxation treaties.

The individuals’ tax regime provided for dividends from shares held in closely held corporations (described in 3.4 Sales of Shares by Individuals in Closely Held Corporations) is also applicable in relation to shareholdings in publicly traded corporations.

Greek and foreign tax-resident individuals are exempt from income tax on gains derived from the sale of exchange-listed shares, except where they hold at least 0.5% of the total share capital and the shares have been acquired on or after 1 January 2009, in which case they are taxed at 15%. Such exempt gains however are included in the taxpayer’s taxable basis for the purposes of special solidarity contribution.

See 3.4 Sales of Shares by Individuals in Closely Held Corporations.

Under domestic legislation, entities or individuals that are not resident in Greece will be subject to income tax in Greece only by way of withholding on Greek-source interest, royalties and dividends. Any tax so withheld exhausts their Greek tax liability. This is provided that they do not have a permanent establishment in Greece to which the relevant profits would be attributable.

Under domestic law, 5% withholding tax applies on dividends acquired as of 1 January 2020. Dividends distributed to qualifying EU parent companies are exempt from any withholding tax, provided that:

  • the parent company participates in the subsidiary with a minimum holding of 10% in the capital or voting rights for at least 24 months;
  • the beneficiary company receiving the dividend payment is included in the list of companies referred to in Annex I Part A of the EU Parent-Subsidiary Directive;
  • the beneficiary company is tax-resident in an EU member state and, under the terms of an income tax treaty concluded with a third state, is not considered as resident for tax purposes outside the EU; and
  • the beneficiary company is subject to one of the taxes listed in Annex I, Part B of the Directive, without the possibility of an option or of being exempt, or to any other tax that may be substituted for any of those taxes.

Until completion of the minimum holding period, a bank guarantee for the amount of withholding tax that would otherwise be due can be deployed instead of payment of the withholding tax and a posterior refund claim. A special anti-avoidance rule prohibits the withholding tax exemption on the above qualifying dividend payments to the extent that the relevant exemption is claimed in the context of artificial arrangements that are not put in place for valid commercial reasons reflecting economic reality, but are instead aimed mainly at obtaining a tax advantage.

Under domestic law, 20% withholding tax applies on Greek-source royalties and 15% withholding tax applies on Greek-source interest.

Interest and Royalties

Interest and royalties paid to qualifying EU associated companies are exempt from any withholding tax, provided that:

  • the beneficiary company receiving the interest or royalties participates in the payor with a minimum holding of 25% in the capital or voting rights for at least 24 months, or the payor participates in the beneficiary company with the same minimum holding, or a third company participates in the payor and the beneficiary with the same minimum holding;
  • the beneficiary is included in the list of companies referred to in the Annex to the EU Interest Royalties Directive;
  • the beneficiary is tax-resident in an EU member state and is not considered as resident for tax purposes outside the EU under the terms of an income tax treaty concluded with a third state; and
  • the beneficiary company is subject to one of the taxes listed in the EU Interest Royalties Directive, without the possibility of an option or of being exempt, or to any other tax that may be substituted for any of those taxes.

Until completion of the minimum holding period, a bank guarantee for the amount of withholding tax that would otherwise be due can be deployed instead of payment of the withholding tax and a posterior refund claim.

Further Exemptions

Withholding tax exemptions on the above types of payments also apply, under similar conditions to those applicable to payments to EU qualifying companies, in respect of payments to beneficiaries in Switzerland.

Interest payments effected as of 1 January 2020 towards non-resident individuals and legal entities that do not maintain a permanent establishment in Greece are exempt from interest withholding tax insofar as such interest is on corporate bonds listed on trading venues within the EU or on organised markets outside the EU, provided such markets are regulated by an authority accredited by the International Organization of Securities Commission.

Treaties

Domestic withholding tax rates on interest, dividends and royalties can be reduced or eliminated if payments are made to beneficiaries in income tax treaty jurisdictions.

Greece currently has income tax treaties in force with countries throughout the world. All tax treaties follow the OECD Model in principle, except for those concluded with the USA and the UK.

Based on data from the Bank of Greece, the primary tax treaty countries that foreign investors use to make investments in local corporate stock or debt are Germany, France, Switzerland, Cyprus, Canada, the USA, China, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and Spain.

To the extent that appropriate documentation, which includes a tax residence certificate signed by the competent foreign authorities, is available, it is uncommon for local tax authorities to challenge the use of treaty country entities by non-treaty country residents. In any event, on 26 January 2021 Greece ratified the OECD Multilateral Instrument implementing the tax treaty-related BEPS measures (MLI) and has adopted the principal purpose test preventing arrangements and transactions whose main purpose is to obtain the benefits of the tax treaty.

Taxable profits are subject to readjustment in the case of transactions between related parties which are not in line with the arm’s-length principle. An individual or legal entity participating directly or indirectly in the capital or management of an enterprise is defined as a related party for transfer pricing purposes. A 33% threshold applies with respect to the minimum direct or indirect participation in the capital or the exercise of voting rights, above which entities are defined as related. The exercise of managerial control or decisive influence over an enterprise is also used as a means to define related parties, irrespective of any participation in the controlled enterprise’s capital or voting rights.

Most transfer pricing disputes had revolved around the applicability of more lenient penalties for failure to comply with transfer pricing documentation requirements and the burden of proving compliance with the arm’s-length principle. This latter issue has evolved over time. Administrative courts have confirmed that, as long as the taxpayer produces the appropriate transfer pricing documentation, the burden lies with the tax authority, which is required to justify any challenge made to the taxpayer’s position.

More recently, the role of each related party in the development, enhancement, maintenance, protection and exploitation (DEMPE) functions of intangible assets has been an element of increasing significance in the scrutiny of related-party transactions between domestic licensees and foreign IP-holding entities. Matters concerning the reliability of comparable data, the definition of related parties, the use of full or interquartile range, the reasonableness of comparability adjustments and, lately, the appropriateness of selected transfer pricing methods have also been coming into the discussion.

As tax authorities focus increasingly on transfer pricing, the discussion surrounding it are expected to increase.

Limited risk distribution arrangements are extensively applied by multinational enterprises doing business in Greece. Tax authorities are carefully scrutinising these arrangements in the context of transfer pricing audits, focusing primarily on whether the return of the local entity can be considered consistent with the arm’s-length principle following in-depth reviews of its functional and risk profile.

The reliability of comparables is also challenged in this context. In some instances, the tax authorities challenge the selection of the transfer pricing method or of the tested party.

The current legal framework fully endorses the arm’s-length principle, defined in Article 9 of the OECD Model Tax Convention and interpreted by the OECD Transfer Pricing Guidelines, following the revisions introduced as a result of Actions 8–10.

Lately, Greek tax authorities have focused on providing the procedural framework for MAPs and on aligning the domestic framework with the recommendations received in the context of the MAP Peer Review Report (Stage 1). Until recently, however, the application of MAPs processes was rare and therefore the local tax authorities have not yet developed any consistent practice or view in this respect.

Compensating adjustments are allowed under Greek legislation.

Greece has incorporated MAPs into most of its bilateral tax treaties. A Greek corporation may therefore request a competent authority’s assistance with the adjustment of its income in cases where a transfer pricing adjustment in a foreign country, in respect of a transaction to which such corporation is a party, may lead to double taxation. In addition, Greece has ratified the OECD MLI. In respect of MAP, Greece chose to apply Part VI introducing the mandatory binding arbitration mechanism, with:

  • a reservation as to the period within which the mandatory binding arbitration must be concluded;
  • opting for a for a reasoned opinion arbitration instead of baseball arbitration; and
  • excluding from the scope certain cases, such as those involving the application of domestic anti-abuse rules.

Until recently, the application of MAPs processes was rare. This has mostly been due to the lack of legal and procedural framework. Having committed to the implementation of the OECD BEPS Action 14 minimum standard, Greece enacted the legislation required to establish clear procedural rules on access to and use of MAPs.

The application of this legislation was then rendered possible after the determination of several procedural details (such as the competent authority, form and substance requirements, compatibility with cases pending before court, legal type and results of MAPs decision, communication requirements, etc) by means of administrative guidelines, which have been recently amended in light of findings of the MAP Peer Review.

In general, local branches of non-local corporations are not taxed differently, in respect of their Greek profits, to local subsidiaries of non-local corporations. A tax on remittance of profits to the head office that was previously applicable has now been repealed. In practice, the deductibility of interest payments to the head office may sometimes be challenged by the tax authorities.

Capital gains of non-resident corporations on the sale of stock in local corporations are not subject to tax, provided that the stock is not held through a permanent establishment in Greece. Under a rule whose application has been suspended several times, and which is still in suspension until 31 December 2022, gains derived from the transfer of real estate property, as well as from the transfer of shares in companies that derive more than 50% of their value, either directly or indirectly, from real estate by individuals who are not engaged in business activities, are subject to capital gains tax at 15%. In view of the consecutive suspensions, it has not been clarified whether such rules may also apply to non-resident companies directly or indirectly transferring stock in local corporations.

Tax losses carried forward are forfeited if the direct or indirect participation in the capital or voting rights of a local company changes by more than 33% within a fiscal year, while at the same time – within the same or the next fiscal year – the local company changes its business activity in a way that affects more than 50% of its turnover as compared to the turnover prior to the change.

Tax losses are not forfeited if the company is able to prove that the activity change is grounded on reasons that are economically justifiable in the context of the company’s business, such as cost cutting, achieving economies of scale or achieving an intercompany restructuring.

Currently, no formulas are used to determine the income of foreign-owned local affiliates selling goods or providing services.

Τax authorities can determine taxable income through indirect techniques, such as by an analysis of the price to turnover ratio or cash position, and also through other techniques set out in the legislation.

Taxable profits are subject to readjustment in the case of transactions between related parties that are not in line with the arm’s-length principle.

Payments by local affiliates for management and administrative expenses incurred by a non-local affiliate may be disallowed to the extent they are not in accordance with arm’s-length standards, if they are not considered to serve the business purposes of the local affiliate or if they are not properly documented and recorded in the books reflecting the transactions of the relevant fiscal period. Payments to persons residing in states deemed as non-co-operative or preferential are not deductible, unless the taxpayer proves that these expenses are incurred for real transactions and do not result in profit-shifting aimed at tax avoidance or evasion.

If the states in question are EU/EEA member states, payments to persons that are resident in such states are, in principle, deductible. The regimes that are deemed to be non-co-operative or preferential are set annually by means of governmental decision on the basis of criteria set in the law, including, for preferential regimes, the criterion of taxation of profits or gains at a rate that is equal to or less than 50% of the applicable Greek income tax rate for corporations.

There are no constraints relating specifically to related-party borrowing by foreign-owned local affiliates paid to non-local affiliates, except that interest must be in line with the arm’s-length standard.

Local corporations are taxed on their worldwide income, with the exception of business income attributable to a permanent establishment in one of the few jurisdictions that has a double taxation treaty with Greece that provides an exemption method. Any foreign tax paid can be credited against the Greek income tax payable, to the extent that the foreign tax does not exceed the Greek tax corresponding to such income.

There are no local expenses that are treated as non-deductible because of attribution to exempt foreign income in particular. Limitations on the deductibility of interest on loans used to finance participations that yield tax-exempt dividend and capital gains income apply equally to foreign and domestic income.

Dividends from foreign subsidiaries are included in the tax basis of local corporations for income tax purposes.

An underlying tax credit in respect of tax paid on the profits from which dividends are derived at the source state is allowed with respect to dividends sourced from countries with which Greece has concluded a double tax treaty that provides for such a credit mechanism (such as the United Kingdom, China and Cyprus).

Inbound dividends received by Greek companies from qualifying EU subsidiaries are exempt from income tax under the conditions detailed in 4.1 Withholding Taxes.

The exemption from Greek income tax on dividends received by Greek companies from qualifying EU subsidiaries applies to the extent that such profits are not deductible by the subsidiary. This amendment targets hybrid instruments and aims at preventing situations of double non-taxation due to mismatches in the tax treatment of profit distribution between the states in which the subsidiary and the parent company are situated.

Gains or royalties derived from the transfer or licensing of an intangible developed by a local corporation to a non-local subsidiary are included in the taxable basis of the local corporation for income tax purposes. Transfers of intangibles between related parties due to business restructurings, whereby intangible assets or a transfer package consisting of functions, assets, risks and business opportunities are being transferred, whether within or outside Greece, should be made in exchange for arm’s-length remuneration, and any gain is taxable without the possibility of payment of the relevant tax in instalments.

Local corporations can be taxed on the income of their non-local subsidiaries and permanent establishments as earned, under CFC rules. In accordance with such rules, which were recently revised to incorporate part of the EU Anti-Tax Avoidance Directive as well as the BEPS measures into Greek domestic law, profits earned by a CFC are added to the taxable profits of the local corporation, under the following conditions:

  • the local corporation by itself – or together with its associated enterprises – holds directly or indirectly a participation of more than 50% in the voting rights, or owns directly or indirectly a percentage of more than 50% of the capital, or is entitled to receive more than 50% of the profits of the relevant CFC (legal person or entity);
  • the actual corporate tax paid on the CFC’s profits is less than 50% of the corporate tax that would have been charged on such profits in Greece; and
  • 30% or more of the income before taxes accruing to the CFC falls within the following categories:
    1. interest or any other income generated by financial assets;
    2. royalties or any other income generated from intellectual property;
    3. dividends and income from the disposal of shares;
    4. income from financial leasing and income from insurance, banking and other financial activities; and
    5. income from companies that undertake invoicing and realise income from sales and services and income from goods and services purchased from and sold to associated enterprises, adding no or little economic value.

CFC rules do not apply to companies or permanent establishments resident in EEA member states, provided that such entities carry on a substantive economic activity supported by staff, equipment, assets and premises, as evidenced by all relevant facts and circumstances. In such cases, the tax authorities bear the burden to prove the absence of a substantive economic activity.

In the case of distribution by a CFC of profits that are included in the taxable basis of the local corporation, any CFC income taxed in a previous fiscal year is deducted from the relevant taxable basis.

There are no uniform rules related to the substance of non-local affiliates. Guidelines can be found on a case-by-case basis with respect to certain specific anti-avoidance provisions. Factors that can be taken into account are physical presence, full-time employees, active VAT number and taxation. Financial statements and information about the business organisation can also be taken into account, along with the other factors.

Gains on the sale by local corporations of shares in non-local affiliates are fully included in the taxable basis for income tax purposes, with the exception of gains on the disposal of shares in EU Parent-Subsidiary Directive-qualifying subsidiaries in respect of which legal persons are exempt under certain conditions (see 2.7 Capital Gains Taxation).

Apart from the specific anti-avoidance provisions mentioned above, on 1 January 2014 a General Anti-abuse Rule was introduced for the first time in Greece, as part of the wider measures to combat tax evasion or avoidance. Such rule was recently amended to incorporate part of the EU Anti-Tax Avoidance Directive into Greek domestic law. The rule allows tax authorities to ignore an arrangement or a series of arrangements which, having been put into place for the main purpose or one of the main purposes of obtaining a tax advantage that defeats the object or purpose of the applicable tax law, are not genuine having regard to all relevant facts and circumstances.

An arrangement is to be regarded as non-genuine to the extent that it is not put into place for valid commercial reasons that reflect economic reality. In such cases, the tax liability is determined as the tax liability that would arise in the absence of such an arrangement.

In accordance with the relevant guidelines, the burden of proof is on the tax authorities. Moreover, no avoidance is considered to exist solely by reason of a taxpayer seeking to reduce its tax burden.

A specific anti-abuse rule applies in respect of tax-neutral corporate reorganisations such as mergers, share-for-share exchanges, spin-offs and demergers effected under the framework of the Income Tax Code, according to which tax benefits are withdrawn in whole or in part where the principal objective or one of the principal objectives behind the reorganisation is tax evasion or avoidance.

Tax authorities can audit the accuracy of tax returns, as well as the general compliance of taxpayers with their tax obligations, on the basis of procedures provided for in the Tax Procedures Code currently in force, and pursuant to the legislation applicable to periods prior to the Code’s enactment in 2013, depending on the year audited. The state’s right to assess taxes in addition to those deriving from a taxpayer’s tax return is, in principle, time-barred, and lapses after a period of five years as of the end of the year when a tax return is due to be filed (ie, effectively after six years as of the audited year).

There are a number of derogations from this principle, either on the basis of specified exceptions or due to the operation of transitional provisions in relation to the regime applicable prior to the enactment of the Code. Exceptions include cases of tax evasion, where the prescription period is ten years in principle, and cases where the Greek tax authorities have requested information from foreign authorities, in which case the right is time-barred to lapse one year after the receipt of the information.

Legislative Extensions

As regards the legislative extension of prescription periods immediately prior to expiry (a practice consistently followed in the past), in a landmark decision that was issued in 2017 and has been endorsed by the Greek tax authorities, the Supreme Administrative Court ruled that the legal provisions extending prescription periods should be in accordance with the constitutional principle of limited retroactivity of tax laws, and therefore should be enacted no later than one year after the year when the relevant tax obligation arose.

Audits and Tax Assessments

The Greek tax authorities are obliged to publish annually the number of full and partial tax audits prioritised for the following year on the basis of risk-analysis criteria and other available information, and they are subject to percentage-based audit targets.

In general, all large businesses can be expected to be audited within the time limits described above.

Taxpayers can challenge a tax assessment by filing an out-of-court administrative appeal against such assessment.

Greece is largely compliant with the principles developed and the measures recommended by the OECD/G20 BEPS action plan. In addition, being an EU member state, Greece is bound to transpose into domestic law the EU Directives that implement OECD/G20 BEPS conclusions at an EU level.

Since the introduction of a new income tax code on 1 January 2014, Greece has implemented various measures in compliance with the BEPS principles, also as implemented by the EU, namely CFC rules, interest deduction limitations, rules neutralising the effects of hybrid mismatch arrangements and rules on the mandatory disclosure of potentially aggressive tax planning arrangements.

Hybrids

In relation to hybrids, Greece has transposed the provisions of the EU Anti-Tax Avoidance Directive and of EU Directive 2017/952 amending the EU Anti-Tax Avoidance Directive as regards hybrid mismatches with third countries. In addition, Greece had previously transposed into domestic law the amendments made to the EU Parent-Subsidiary Directive, in accordance with which dividends paid by EU-based qualifying subsidiaries are not taxed to the extent that such profits are not deductible by the subsidiary. Greece has also transposed into domestic law the EU Directives providing for the automatic exchange of information on cross-border tax rulings and advance pricing agreements between EU member states.

Updated Domestic Frameworks

Greece has recently updated its domestic legal framework regarding the mutual agreement procedure provided under tax treaties and the EU Arbitration Convention, through the introduction of special rules in the Tax Procedures Code and the publication of administrative guidelines. Also, by ratifying the MLI, mandatory binding arbitration mechanisms for resolving issues under MAP shall be available.

Also, the current legal framework fully endorses the arm’s-length principle, as defined in Article 9 of the OECD Model Tax Convention and interpreted by the OECD Transfer Pricing Guidelines, following the revisions introduced as a result of Actions 8–10.

As regards Action 13, Greece has also introduced into domestic legislation the automatic exchange of CbC reports amongst EU member states, as well as amongst the signatories of the Multilateral Competent Authority Agreement on the Exchange of CbC Reports (concerning multinational enterprises with an annual consolidated turnover exceeding EUR750 million). A relevant bilateral agreement has also been concluded with the USA.

In general, the Greek government fully endorsed the BEPS project from the outset, was eager to adopt legislation in this direction and actively participated in the BEPS-related works, by means of including representatives of the General Secretariat of Public Revenue in the relevant working groups. Currently, this approach continues through, among others, the participation of the Independent Authority for Public Revenue in all the meetings of the Inclusive Framework on BEPS, where countries collaborate on the implementation of the BEPS package.

International tax has a high public profile in Greece, most notably with respect to transfer pricing and the general objective of transparency. Transfer pricing has become an area of primary focus, both in terms of public opinion and at the level of tax authorities. A fully dedicated team within Greece’s Independent Authority for Public Revenue deals with the transfer pricing legislative framework, including the issuance of decisions on APAs and MAPs.

An example of the tax authorities’ commitment in addressing international tax issues, is that detailed guidance was issued in 2020 with respect to the interpretation of the provisions of tax treaties in view of the situations created as a result of COVID-19, in line also with OECD recommendations.

At this time, the primary focus in Greece is on the collection of taxes and the enhancement of attitudes towards tax compliance. Concurrently, one of the government’s tax policy goals is the creation of an attractive business environment through the reduction of tax rates affecting businesses. Such measures do not appear to be conflicting with the BEPS outcomes. It should be ensured that BEPS-related measures in particular and anti-tax avoidance rules are not implemented by the tax authorities in an overly restrictive manner.

There are no significant features of Greece’s tax system that are particularly vulnerable to measures aiming to achieve the BEPS objectives in particular.

As regards proposals for dealing with hybrid instruments, as mentioned in 9.1 Recommended Changes, Greece has transposed into domestic law the amendments made to the EU Parent-Subsidiary Directive, in accordance with which dividends paid by EU-based qualifying subsidiaries are not taxed to the extent that such profits are not deductible by the subsidiary, and are taxed to the extent that such profits are deductible by the subsidiary.

Greece has transposed the provisions of the EU Anti-Tax Avoidance Directive and of EU Directive 2017/952 amending the EU Anti-Tax Avoidance Directive as regards hybrid mismatches with third countries. In accordance, hybrid mismatches are the consequence of differences in the legal characterisation of payments (financial instruments) or entities with a possible effect of a deduction in both states or a deduction of the income in one state without inclusion in the tax base of the other. The rules lay down rules whereby one of the two jurisdictions in a mismatch should deny the deduction of a payment leading to such an outcome.

Greece generally imposes tax on worldwide income, in the sense that it also exercises taxation rights in respect of the foreign-source income earned by Greek tax residents. Foreign tax residents are taxed in Greece under a territorial system, ie, they are only taxed on Greek-source income. It is notable that profits distributed by EU subsidiaries are exempt from corporate income tax in Greece, subject to specific requirements under the rules transposing the Parent-Subsidiary Directive.

Legal persons are exempt under conditions from tax on capital gains arising from the disposal of shares in EU Parent-Subsidiary Directive-qualifying subsidiaries (see 2.7 Capital Gains Taxation). In such cases, apart from the generally applicable interest deductibility limitations, interest incurred as a result of financing the relevant participations is not deductible. The BEPS-related interest deducibility limitation of up to 30% of EBITDA operates subject to a de minimis threshold of exceeding borrowing costs set at EUR3 million annually, which makes it likely to affect a smaller number of Greek enterprises.

As mentioned in 9.7 Territorial Tax Regime, Greece does not have a territorial tax regime, and Greek CFC rules only capture profits of CFCs that fall under certain categories. When it comes to subsidiaries established in ΕΕΑ member states, Greece does not have sweeper CFC rules: even if such states are low-rate jurisdictions, the relevant subsidiaries and permanent establishments are outside the scope of the CFC rules if such entities carry on a substantive economic activity supported by staff, equipment, assets and premises, as evidenced by all relevant facts and circumstances.

In the context of the MLI, Greece has adopted the principal purpose test (PPT) rule in order to prevent the abuse of benefits derived from its tax treaty network. Greece has explicitly opted out of the Simplified Limitation of Benefits. As detailed in 7.1 Overarching Anti-avoidance Provisions, Greece incorporated a general anti-abuse rule into domestic law in 2014.

Both inbound and outbound investors may, therefore, be affected by a combination of the domestic law provisions, the anti-avoidance rules to be included in the double taxation treaties, and the EU rules as transposed into domestic law. Consequently, existing and new structures should be carefully reviewed from all of these perspectives.

Prior to BEPS, the applicable legal framework for transfer pricing in Greece fully endorsed the arm’s-length principle as defined in Article 9 of the OECD Model Tax Convention and interpreted by the OECD Transfer Pricing Guidelines; currently, it also follows the revisions introduced as a result of Actions 8–10 of the OECD BEPS project. In general, no radical changes have taken place under the BEPS transfer pricing changes. As regards documentation, the required content of the local transfer pricing files is not yet fully aligned with BEPS Action 13, particularly in relation to value chain analysis.

As mentioned in 9.1 Recommended Changes, one relevant change is that, in the aftermath of BEPS, Greece has also introduced into domestic legislation the automatic exchange of CbC reports amongst EU Member States, as well as amongst the signatories of the Multilateral Competent Authority Agreement on the Exchange of CbC Reports (concerning multinational enterprises with an annual consolidated turnover exceeding EUR750 million) and the USA, with the first reporting year being the year commencing 1 January 2016. Surrogate reporting and local notification requirements have also been adopted.

Information on the ownership of intangible assets in the group, as well as related-party transactions for the licensing of rights on intangible assets, forms part of the transfer pricing documentation required under domestic law. The role of each related party in the development, enhancement, maintenance, protection and exploitation (DEMPE) functions of intangible assets is an element of increasing significance in terms of the scrutiny of related-party transactions between domestic licensees and foreign IP-holding entities.

Although transparency, country-by-country reporting and mandatory disclosure of potentially aggressive tax planning arrangements are positive measures in terms of combatting tax avoidance, care should be taken that the relevant implementation rules and their interpretation by the tax authorities lead to the minimum possible compliance burden for enterprises, and where applicable measures should be adopted to ensure that the relevant procedures do not lead to the unnecessary disclosure of commercial information.

Greece has not implemented any changes specifically relating to the taxation of transactions effected or profits generated by digital economy businesses operating largely from outside the jurisdiction. At a local direct taxation level, Greece has a legal framework regarding the taxation of short-term rentals in the sharing economy through digital platforms.

In the context of the OECD/G20 Inclusive Framework on BEPS, Greece participates in the OECD Task Force on the Digital Economy, which works towards a consensus-based long-term solution to the broader challenges arising from the digitalisation of the economy.

See 9.12 Taxation of Digital Economy Businesses.

Greece imposes withholding tax on royalties paid to offshore owners in exchange for the use of intellectual property. Rates can be reduced or eliminated if payments are made to beneficiaries in income tax treaty jurisdictions. Moreover, payments to persons residing in states deemed as non-co-operative or preferential are not deductible, unless the taxpayer proves that these expenses are incurred for real transactions and do not result in profit-shifting aimed at tax avoidance or evasion.

Zepos & Yannopoulos

280 Kifissias Ave.
152 32 Halandri
Athens
Greece

+30 210 6967 000

+30 210 6994 640

info@zeya.com www.zeya.com
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Trends and Developments


Author



Machas & Partners Law Firm is an independent, full-service corporate and commercial law firm with a strong presence in Greece, consisting of five partners and ten associates. The firm has extensive activity in Greek and international corporate tax advisory services, M&A, private client tax and wealth advisory services, and tax diagnostic reviews, audits and litigation. Tax-related areas include research and consultation on the direct and indirect tax treatment of proposed transactions, investments and businesses both in Greece and abroad; interpretation of tax legislation and advising on obligations and tax issues arising therefrom, including assessing tax exposure and risk; cross-border taxation of profits, dividends, royalties and interest, and international tax and customs implications in cross-border transactions; general anti-abuse and anti-avoidance legislation; remuneration policies for executives and employees; and ad hoc corporate and private tax advice.

Introduction

Greece ranks 29th overall on the 2020 International Tax Competitiveness Index. Greece’s ranking in the Tax Competitiveness Index (the "Index") underlines the need for Greece to improve its position in the Index in order to become more attractive for investments and creating new jobs. The right-wing party that entered into government in July 2019 has begun implementing a flurry of never seen before tax reforms, both for private individuals as well as businesses, that should be able to move Greece in the short term to the 27th and in the long term to the 22nd position in the Index rankings. Below is a brief summary of the trends and developments in taxation in Greece.

Income Tax and Capital Gains

Greece’s corporate income tax rate has been on a bit of a bumpy ride over the last several years. After hitting a low point of 20% in 2011, Greece’s rate was hiked in two stages until it reached 29% in 2015. Greece brought the corporate income tax rate down from the 28% to 24%, moving Greece closer to the current OECD average of 23.6%. It is in the government’s mid-term plans to lower Greece’s corporate income tax rate back to 20%.

In addition, the Greek government lowered the income tax rate for dividends even lower from 10% to 5%, making the tax rate one of the lowest. 

As of 1 July 2020, Greek companies are exempt from capital gains tax arising from the disposal of “participations” held in legal entities, provided that they hold at least 10% participation for a period of 24 months and the conditions of Directive 2011/96/EU (Parent-Subsidiary Directive) are met. This income is not subject to tax upon distribution or capitalization, whereas any related expenses are not deductible. This reform is revolutionary for Greek corporate Greek income tax as the exemption applied only to dividends arising from “participations” and not

Foreign companies are as of 1 January 2020 exempt from tax on interest they generate from listed corporate bonds. Moreover, tax exemption for interest and royalty payments between associated enterprises in accordance with the provisions of Directive 2003/49/EU (Interest-Royalties Directive) applies equally to payments paid between Greek companies.

Tax Deductibles

It should be noted that Greece has also passed several tax incentives for companies adopting measures that are in favour of corporate social and environmental responsibility as well as companies that wish to make donations to the Greek State.

Greece has also made it easier to write off bad debts (VAT included) up to EUR300 per debtor without obliging the company to file law suits, provided that bad debts written off do not exceed 5% of the total amount of the receivables of the business per tax year. Moreover, bad debts can also be written off in the context of mutual agreement or judicial settlement.

Expenses related to R&D are deducted at the time of their realisation at their full (100%) actual expense (rather than the previous 30%). Even more importantly, the manner in which R&D expenses are certified has also been changed. Now, the certification procedure is effected through an audit report issued by a certified auditor or audit firm and not (as previously done) by the General Secretariat for Research and Technology, which was a slow and ambiguous process. The above is in effect as of 1 September 2020.

Management Tax Co-liability

Radical changes have also introduced in relation to management’s co-liability in the event the companies they manage fail to pay taxes and social security contributions. First, the law sets out explicitly the taxes for which management can be held personally liable and which are specifically income tax, withholding taxes, consumption taxes, VAT and annual real estate tax (excluding all other taxes such as stamp duty, special real estate tax, real estate transfer tax, standalone penalties, etc). Second, in order for joint liability to be established, management must be acting at fault in relation to the non-payment of the above-mentioned taxes, as opposed to the previous regime, where liability was established objectively, merely due to the management capacity as such.

Real Estate

In order to boost sales of real estate in Greece, VAT on sales of new buildings (with a construction permit issued as of 1 January 2006) has been suspended up to 31 December 2022, albeit it is questionable whether the this is compatible with the EU VAT Directive. It should be noted that real estate transfer tax is imposed on the sale, whereas the constructor is obliged to settle the corresponding input VAT.

Additional exemptions from the special real estate tax of 15% has been introduced, applicable for institutional and other international investors engaged in the real estate market, indicatively applicable to: real estate mutual funds, venture capital funds, European long-term investment funds, alternative investment funds, UCITS, European venture capital funds and European social entrepreneurship funds.

The minimum taxation (0.75% imposed on the average net asset value of investments) of Greek REICs (real estate investment companies), real estate mutual funds and portfolio investment companies has been abolished, as is the minimum taxation of UCITS. REICs have to pay an annual tax set a rate set at 10% of the ECB intervention rate increased by one point and is calculated on the average of the investments, plus any available funds, at their current value. On the basis of the above, the current annual tax rate is 0.125% slashed from 0.75%).

Exit Tax

Article 58 of Law 4714/20 incorporated the provisions of Article 5 of Directive (EU) 2016/1164, with the addition of Article 66A to the Greek Income Tax Code. The new provisions provide that if a Greek company or permanent establishment (PE) transfers assets, its business or its tax residence out of Greece as of 1 January 2020 onwards, any capital gain (even if not yet realized at the time of exit) is subject to Greek corporate income tax.

In particular, exit taxation is imposed on the following cases:

  • transfer of assets from a Greek to a foreign affiliate or PE, subject to Greece not being able to tax the transferred asset;
  • transfer of tax residence of a Greek company or PE out of Greece, except for those assets that remain connected with a PE in Greece; and
  • transfer of the business carried on by a PE from Greece to a foreign country, subject to Greece not being able to tax the transferred assets due to the transfer.

The tax basis for calculating the capital gain is the difference between the market value at the time of the exit and the value the particular asset or business had for tax purposes.

The exit tax is paid though in one lump sum, exhausting any further income tax liability. Alternatively, the exit tax can be paid in five5 equal interest-free installments, in the event the assets or the business have been transferred to an EU member state or to a third country that is party to the EEA Agreement.

It should be noted that transfers of assets in particular circumstances may not be subject to exit tax, if the said assets will return to Greece within 12 months.

Hybrid Mismatch

Article 59 of Law 4714/20 incorporated the provisions of Article 9 of Directive (EU) 2016/1164, with the addition of Article 66B to the Greek Income Tax Code, establishing rules for hybrid mismatches (“mismatches”). In particular, mismatches effectively arise when two countries characterise payments differently, often leading to the double deduction of the same payment (as an expense or a loss) or the deduction of a payment in one country without the same payment being taxed in the other country.

It should be noted that the commentaries and examples of the OECD BEPS Action 2 Report can be used in Greece for construction purposes. However, it should be noted that, if the provisions of another Directive resolve any mismatches, these rules do not apply.

Mismatches are applicable only between related companies and PEs within the same group or through a structured arrangement and they do not apply to individuals. In order for the company or a PE to be considered “related” a participation rate of 50% or more is required.

Tax Incentives to Angel Investors

According to the new Article 70A of the Greek Income Tax Code, individuals (not companies) who contribute capital to Greek start-up companies duly registered with the National Registrar of Start Up Companies of the General Secretariat for Research and Innovation of the Ministry of Development and Investments can deduct from their taxable income, an amount equal to 50% of the amount of their contribution, in the tax year in which the contribution was made. This incentive applies to capital contributions via a bank deposit of up to EUR300,000 per tax year, which are invested in up to three start-ups with a maximum investment of EUR100,000 per start-up.

Share Option Plans

The Greek Income Tax Code has introduced, as of 1 January 2020, an exemption from income tax in connection with the receipt of shares received by an employee or a shareholder from a legal person or legal entity within the framework of a share option plan, in which the achievement of specific goals or the occurrence of a specific event, is set as prerequisite in order for the shares to be awarded. The capital gain arising for an employee or shareholder constitutes taxable income if the shares are sold 24 months after acquiring the share options.

Moreover, the capital gain on shares of a company that is a non-listed small enterprise or a very small enterprise is subject to 5% capital gains tax (and not at the standard 15% capital gains tax rate), provided that the following conditions are cumulatively met:

  • the above rights are acquired within five years after the establishment of the company;
  • the company has not been incorporated through a merger; and
  • the shares are transferred after the completion of 36 months from the acquisition of the share option.

Retroactive Effect of Advance Pricing Agreements (APAs)

Under the previous law, APAs were issued only for future cross-border transactions between related parties for a pre-determined period of no more than four years. L.4714/2020 introduced, for the first time in Greece, the possibility of retroactive effect of APAs subject to the fulfillment of the following conditions:

  • the facts and circumstances of the previous years are the same as the ones of the year of the application;
  • there is no statute of limitation for the Greek State to carry out a tax audit; and
  • the applicant has not been notified of a tax audit.

In the case an APA is issued, pursuant to which the Greek company has to submit an amending income tax return, the Company will not pay interest and late payment fines.

E-books and E-invoicing

Law 4701/20 that was passed on 30 June 2020 introduced a new provision in the Greek Income Tax Code (70 f), pursuant to which companies opting for e-invoicing through licensed providers, are granted the following tax incentives:

  • reduction of the statute of limitation by two years;
  • the cost of the equipment and software purchased for the respective e-invoicing as well as the costs for producing, transmitting, and filing of e-invoices for the first year are deducted in the year of purchase, the deductible cost being increased by 100%; and
  • the tax refund timeline is reduced to 45 days (from 90 days).

Out-of-Court Settlement of Disputes

With the aim of quickly resolving pending tax disputes before the tax courts, an Out-of-Court Tax Dispute Resolution Committee has been established for resolving specific issues, which are the following:

  • statute of limitation of the State’s right to impose taxes or penalties;
  • wrong charging of tax or penalty due to an obvious lack of a tax obligation or calculating error;
  • retroactive effect of more favorable tax sanctions; and
  • reduction of additional taxes, interest, surcharges and penalties.

The application may only apply to pending cases that have not been discussed by 30 October 2020. The Committee verifies the allegations based on the case law and the regular practice of the Tax Administration and may propose the acceptance or rejection of the request in whole or in part, submitting a specific proposal to the applicant in each case. In the event the applications is rejected, a report of the out-of-court settlement is drawn up.

Shared Services Centers

Greek L.89/67 provides for a special tax regime for the establishment of Shared Services Centers in Greece in order to provide specific back office support shared services (advisory services, central accounting support, quality control of production, product process and services, design of studies, projects and contracts, advertising and marketing services, data processing, supply of information, research and development) to related companies.

The main benefits of the regime are that:

  • the taxable profits are determined based on the cost-plus method;
  • the applicable mark-up is pre-approved by the above-mentioned decision and is reviewed every five years;
  • all expenses on which the mark-up applies are tax deductible for corporate income tax purposes (without any conditions); and
  • transfer pricing obligations are fulfilled by the receipt of the relevant Ministerial Decision.

Under the new law the range of shared services has been expanded to include the following:

  • T software development;
  • computer programming and IT support;
  • storage and management of records and data;
  • management of suppliers, customers and supply chain, excluding transportation by own means;
  • HR management and training of employees; and
  • computer-based call center and telephone information services.

Moreover, companies that opt for the regime of L.89/1967 may also receive financial support in the form of grants, covering part of the eligible expenses.

The supply of the above shared services does not constitute a place of effective management in Greece by the foreign company established in Greece.

The preconditions set are that the companies develop a new activity, either regarding the nature of the services rendered or the companies to which those services are rendered, which must not have been performed in Greece for the last two years until the date on which the application to receive the grant is submitted, and a minimum number of new jobs is created by the new activity, which are maintained for a minimum specified period.

Greek Stamp Duty on Loans

One of the biggest financing problems faced by companies in Greece the past decades has been the imposition of stamp duty of 2.4% on the capital and interest of non-banking loans and credits issued to or by Greek companies.

However, the above regime came to a halt following Greece’s Supreme Administrative Court’s (SAC) landmark decisions No 2163-4/2020 and No 2323-5/2020, which ruled that the granting of non-banking loans in exchange for interest by VAT able persons falls within the scope of VAT. Thus, according to Article 63 of the Greek VAT Code such loans and credits are exempt from Greek stamp duty. In particular, the imposition of stamp duty on interest-bearing loans by VATable persons has been abolished since 1987 when VAT was first introduced which explicitly defined that as of the introduction of VAT Law, the stamp duty provisions on cases provided for in the Greek VAT Code (even of exempt) are abolished.

On the basis of the above, the SAC, held that the granting of interest-bearing loans by a VATable person acting in that capacity, constitutes a supply of services in exchange for consideration (ie, interest) and such activity should be subject to VAT (and not stamp duty) thus falling within the general concept of granting of credits.

Conclusion

The trends and developments in the area of tax will be conducive on economic growth and are heading in the right direction to help Greece improve its tax competitiveness, moving down from the 29th position in the Tax Competitiveness Index, aspiring to reach as low as the 22nd position.

Machas & Partners Law Firm

12, Neofytou Douka str.
Kolonaki 106 74
Athens
Greece

+30 210 721 1100

+30 210 725 4750

tkyriakopoulos@machas-partners.com www.machas-partners.com
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Law and Practice

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Zepos & Yannopoulos was established in 1893, and is a leading Greek law firm renowned for its legal acumen and integrity. It offers comprehensive legal and tax services, with a focus on multinational companies and high net worth individuals. The firm’s tax and accounting practice is acknowledged as the largest and most specialised of any law firm in Greece, and offers the full range of tax services on both a transactional and ongoing basis, covering the areas of business tax advisory and compliance, finance and capital markets taxation, international tax and taxation of M&A, real estate taxation, tax controversy and litigation, transfer pricing, VAT, indirect tax and customs.

Trends and Development

Author



Machas & Partners Law Firm is an independent, full-service corporate and commercial law firm with a strong presence in Greece, consisting of five partners and ten associates. The firm has extensive activity in Greek and international corporate tax advisory services, M&A, private client tax and wealth advisory services, and tax diagnostic reviews, audits and litigation. Tax-related areas include research and consultation on the direct and indirect tax treatment of proposed transactions, investments and businesses both in Greece and abroad; interpretation of tax legislation and advising on obligations and tax issues arising therefrom, including assessing tax exposure and risk; cross-border taxation of profits, dividends, royalties and interest, and international tax and customs implications in cross-border transactions; general anti-abuse and anti-avoidance legislation; remuneration policies for executives and employees; and ad hoc corporate and private tax advice.

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