Insurance & Reinsurance 2020

Insurance and Reinsurance 2020 features 26 jurisdictions. This edition of Insurance and Reinsurance identifies key laws and regulation, issues for overseas businesses, transaction activity, contracts, ART transactions, disputes and emerging risks.

Last Updated: January 20, 2020


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Ince is one of the leading specialist insurance and reinsurance firms in the world with deep roots in the London and international markets. Now in its 150th year, Ince has long been a name that is synonymous with the development of insurance law through the courts, most frequently acting on behalf of insurers and reinsurers. The firm has an extensive client list featuring UK and international insurance and reinsurance companies, Lloyd’s syndicates, captives, intermediaries, brokers, advisers and some assureds. From the firm's office in Lloyd’s of London and international offices spanning Europe, Asia and the Middle Ease, the team of over 34 lawyers advise on corporate & regulatory, marine, property & construction, aviation, reinsurance and ART, specialty, and political risk & trade credit.


In 2019 the drive to modernise the world’s insurance markets has continued apace and that trend will continue in 2020. The changes being introduced are in many cases fundamental and bring with them a range of legal and regulatory challenges for insurers, brokers and regulators alike. 

One aspect of the drive for modernisation is the continuing search by established insurers for new markets and territories in which to expand. This reflects the continuing overcapacity in traditional markets which has increasingly led to market saturation. The desire for expansion is being assisted by regulatory adjustments in some jurisdictions, which are increasingly open to external investment, but it is also challenged by the growing assertiveness of insurers domiciled in emerging markets. It is imperative, therefore, that insurers, related professions and their advisors all understand the different legal and regulatory requirements for operating in different jurisdictions. This Guide, written by experts from around the world, seeks to provide a practical overview of these requirements in the key international jurisdictions.

The growth of insurtech and the wider use of artificial intelligence presents both opportunities and challenges to insurers and brokers. Insurers are using insurtech to create more personalised and better targeted insurance products through the development of sophisticated algorithms to analyse detailed source data and broader market data to produce a highly specific risk profile and price. Similar initiatives are being developed to speed up the handling of claims while increasing insurers’ ability to detect fraud and analyse the cost and benefit of claims disputes. At present, these advances are limited principally to personal lines insurance and SME business, it is expected, however, that they will be applied to larger commercial risks in the coming years.

The increasing use of insurtech, and AI more generally, brings with it significant legal and regulatory challenges and the responses are likely to vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. For example, insurtech involves managing huge quantities of personal data which is often of a sensitive nature. The coming into effect of European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) has created a new legal regime within which insurers have to manage this data and are at risk of very significant financial penalties for non-compliance. Importantly, although this is an EU Regulation, it applies to insurers anywhere in the world who hold information about EU citizens. Potentially, therefore, it has ramifications for insurers and their advisors wherever they may be. Jurisdictions outside Europe, of course, have different approaches to data protection which this Guide seeks to highlight.

One of the key objectives of insurtech is to strengthen the connectivity between insurers and their clients. This is achieved through more personalised underwriting and the adoption of different distribution methods, including social media and internet apps. Many innovative, new products rely on source data gathered through wearable technology and the internet of things. These communications, and information from things like wearable technology, will be subject to a new EU regulation, the ePrivacy Regulation or ePR. As with GDPR, ePR will have a worldwide reach and bring with it the same significant penalties for breach as GDPR. 

We expect 2020 to see the continued growth in the use of blockchain technology by insurers, particularly with regard to the provision of information, the verification of documentation and the contracting process.

All of these technological advances are challenging existing legal assumptions, which are often based on laws developed for an entirely different commercial world. How the laws of different jurisdictions adjust to these challenges is one of the issues we seek to address in this Guide.

As well as the regulatory issues associated with the growth of insurtech, the adoption of AI technology by insurance buyers raises new legal challenges for insurers. Among these is the question of where liability will lie if a piece of AI technology, dependent on machine learning, causes injury or breaks the law. Similar issues will arise in relation to the programming of autonomous ships and vehicles and the choices which they may have to make when faced with the likelihood of collision. The answer to these questions is likely to differ between jurisdictions so it will be important for insurers to understand local laws before accepting business which exposes them to risks of this nature.

It is likely that 2020 will see continuing political instability and tensions between some of the world’s leading economies and the insurance industry is not immune to the commercial consequences of this conflict. For example, the imposition of sanctions by the US and its allies, and the retaliatory sanctions from the targeted countries, is creating a difficult legal and regulatory environment for insurers. These difficulties are only enhanced by conflicts between differing sanctions regimes. For example, European insurers find themselves trapped between renewed US sanctions against Iran and the EU’s Blocking Regulation which is intended to limit the impact of those sanctions on EU-domiciled insurers. Balancing these conflicting regimes raises legal barriers for insurers both in the settlement of claims and in the collection of premiums from risks which impact the sanctions jurisdictions.

These political tensions have also been expressed in actual or alleged cyber-attacks by one country or its proxy against another. These attacks can lead to very significant insured losses, both in targeted countries and in other countries which experience collateral damage’. These losses have raised difficult coverage issues for insurers. Most cyber policies exclude coverage for war and related risk but defining and proving "war" in the context of a cyber-attack often challenges existing legal definitions. 

On a more positive note, 2019 has seen the continuing relaxation of regulations which had limited the ability of insurers to trade in some jurisdictions and this trend is set to increase in 2020. Similarly, regulatory restrictions on European reinsurers doing business in the USA are to be relaxed with a complimentary relaxation of European regulation for US companies. This new regime is set out in the awkwardly titled Bilateral Agreement between the United States of America and the European Union on Prudential Measures Regarding Insurance and Reinsurance, which is more commonly known as the Covered Agreement. The Agreement, which will reduce and ultimately eliminate the collateral which European insurers have to post to write US reinsurance business, was approved by the Council of the EU on 6 April 2018 and will be phased in over the next few years. Consideration is being given to extending the Covered Agreement to cover non-EU countries.

At the time of writing, it seems certain that Brexit will go ahead and that the United Kingdom will leave the EU in January 2020. There will follow a period of transition which is currently set at one year. What will happen after that is unknown and it remains possible that no replacement for the current passporting arrangements will be agreed between the United Kingdom and the remaining EU members. This is one of the many regulatory and legal uncertainties which will continue to hinder European insurers through 2020.  Until the post-Brexit regulatory framework has been agreed, there will inevitably be uncertainty over the ability of UK insurers to write European business (and vice versa) and how that business may be written – for example with respect to the regulation of underwriting agents.

Although 2019 looks likely to be benign in terms of insured losses from natural catastrophes, there is a general concern that climate change will see a long-term increase in the number and severity of catastrophic losses. In addition, climate change is likely to challenge previous assumptions about the nature of the risk posed by natural disasters: for example, flooding may become more frequent and more widespread. From a legal perspective these developments will raise issues of policy construction in relation, for example, to aggregation clauses and the obligation on reinsurers to follow aggregation decisions of the underlying insurer.

At the same time, new risks are emerging, and concern continues about the potential for a "new asbestos"; be that legalised cannabis and medical marijuana, opioids or microplastics and nanotechnology. The legal context for the handling of insurance claims and coverage disputes in different jurisdictions will play a large part in determining the impact of any of these risks, if they do emerge.

Notwithstanding the uncertainty and risk development which the industry faces over the coming years, there is no shortage of investment with private equity houses continuing to show an interest in the industry. The industry has seen continuing consolidation among insurers and brokers in 2019. In addition, money from outside the industry continues to be invested in new insurance vehicles such as insurance-linked securities (ILS) with the first ILS products underwritten under the British government’s new ILS regime. It remains to be seen, however, whether the regulators in the UK and elsewhere can be sufficiently flexible to wrest a meaningful share of this market from Bermuda.

Overall, we expect 2020 to see the continuation and speeding up of the modernisation process across the insurance industry together with a slower, but nonetheless significant, shift towards new markets and new ways of doing business.       

Author



Ince is one of the leading specialist insurance and reinsurance firms in the world with deep roots in the London and international markets. Now in its 150th year, Ince has long been a name that is synonymous with the development of insurance law through the courts, most frequently acting on behalf of insurers and reinsurers. The firm has an extensive client list featuring UK and international insurance and reinsurance companies, Lloyd’s syndicates, captives, intermediaries, brokers, advisers and some assureds. From the firm's office in Lloyd’s of London and international offices spanning Europe, Asia and the Middle Ease, the team of over 34 lawyers advise on corporate & regulatory, marine, property & construction, aviation, reinsurance and ART, specialty, and political risk & trade credit.