White-Collar Crime 2021

Last Updated October 21, 2021

Japan

Law and Practice

Authors



Nagashima Ohno & Tsunematsu (NO&T) is a full-service Japanese law firm with specialists in every field, more than 500 attorneys and six overseas offices in New York and Asian countries. The award-winning compliance/crisis management team at NO&T represents many of the most high-profile corporate regulatory and compliance cases related to the Japanese market or Japanese corporations. The firm has displayed particular strength in regulatory/compliance cases with a cross-border element, leveraging its capabilities to resolve issues in multiple jurisdictions. Many of NO&T’s representations have not only resolved serious crises for its clients, but have also shed light on industry-wide structural problems, often leading to legislative and policy changes. The team has grown to more than 50 lawyers, including former prosecutors, accountants, government officials, PR specialists, and other specialists from various backgrounds.

Overview

Japanese law does not classify crimes into felonies, misdemeanours or other categories. The Penal Code of Japan provides for all the major criminal offences for individuals, and a lot of other laws also provide for criminal offences, including those for judicial persons. In addition to criminal sanctions, government authorities can impose administrative sanctions such as imposing a surcharge, revoking a licence for a regulated business, or disqualifying an entity from the bidding process for a governmental contract.

Elements of Crime

In order to establish a criminal offence, a public prosecutor must prove certain conduct by the defendant that meets the elements set forth in the relevant statute, as well as the criminal intent or negligence of the defendant. The illegality of conduct and criminal liability are also elements of an offence, and the prosecutor must prove such elements if the defendant raises the lack of such elements as a defence.

Many criminal offences require certain consequences of the defendant’s conduct (eg, physical injury of a victim). However, an attempt to commit certain criminal conduct can be punishable even when it does not result in any consequences, if it is specifically criminalised under relevant statutes. Negligence could constitute a criminal offence if it causes physical injury or another serious consequence, and is specifically criminalised under the Penal Code or other laws. Additionally, the Act on Punishment of Organised Crime and Control of Proceeds of Crime, known as the Organised Crime Punishment Act (OCPA), criminalises the conspiracy to commit certain crimes.

The enforcement limitation period starts from the time when the criminal act ceases. Regarding a case of complicity, the period with respect to all accomplices starts from the time the final act of all accomplices ceases (Article 253 of the Code of Criminal Procedure – the CCP). The limitation periods are stipulated according to the type and range of the statutory penalty under Article 250 of the CCP. For example, the CCP stipulates that the statute of limitations runs out after five years with regard to crimes that are punishable with imprisonment of less than ten years, other than for crimes causing the death of a person. Where two or more separate criminal acts are deemed a single criminal act in substance, the limitation period with respect to the entire crime starts from the time that the final act of the entire crime ceases. The limitation period is tolled if an offender is outside Japan or is in hiding, making it impossible to serve a transcript of the written indictment or notify the summary order (Article 255 of the CCP).

Articles 3 and 3-2 of the Penal Code stipulate that persons who have committed certain serious crimes outside Japan are punishable. For example, counterfeiting official Japanese government documents can be classified as a crime, regardless of the nationality of the offender and the location of the conduct. Certain crimes against Japanese nationals committed by non-Japanese offenders outside Japan are also punishable.

However, Japanese enforcement agencies do not have any jurisdiction to enforce their authority outside Japan, and can obtain evidence outside of Japanese territory only through voluntary co-operation with investigations or through mutual legal assistance, as described in 2.5 Mutual Legal Assistance Treaties and Cross-Border Co-operation.

Dual Liability

In principle, only a natural person is criminally liable under Japanese law, and the Penal Code does not set forth any crimes of a judicial person. A judicial person may be held criminally liable only when there are specific provisions for punishment prescribed in the form of a dual liability provision (ryobatsu-kitei) under the laws. A dual liability provision makes entities, including corporations, punishable together with the natural person that is employed or otherwise retained by the entity and actually committed the offence, unless the judicial person proves that it was not negligent in appointing or supervising that natural person, or that it was not negligent regarding the measures it took to prevent the crime.

In addition to dual liability, when there is a triple liability provision, the representative of the entity in which the offender is employed may be held liable if they did not take the necessary measures to prevent the crime. The Act on the Prohibition of Private Monopolisation and the Maintenance of Fair Trade (the AMA) and the Labour Standards Act contain provisions to this effect.

There is no written public policy on when to pursue an indictment against an entity or an individual, or both. While an entity can be convicted only if a certain natural person is criminally liable, a prosecutor sometimes indicts only a natural person and suspends an indictment against an entity when the activities of the entity are found not to be egregious. On the other hand, a prosecutor may only indict an entity and suspend an indictment against a natural person when the activities of the relevant corporate executives or employees are found not to be egregious.

Successor Liability

There is little discussion about criminal successor liability in Japan because only a natural person can be liable in the criminal context, and this issue has not been contested in any notable court cases. While the successor may not be held liable for the predecessor’s conduct in an asset deal, in theory the successor’s liability cannot be ruled out in the case of a merger.

Administrative Sanctions against Entities

Administrative sanctions such as a surcharge can be imposed on an entity without a dual liability provision or an establishment of illegal conduct by a natural person.

Civil Remedy

In addition to criminal disposition to a defendant, a defendant can be subject to civil remedies if their conduct constitutes a tort under the Civil Code. In principle, complaints claiming for damages in tort are filed with a civil division of the court and dealt with separately from the criminal case. A proceeding similar to a class action is available only for cases involving the violation of specific consumer protection laws. Parties other than qualified consumer groups cannot initiate this type of lawsuit and, as a result, the consumer group lawsuit is not commonly used.

Restitution Order

The restitution order system is available for victims of crime who are suffering from physical injury, unlawful confinement or kidnapping, but victims of white-collar crimes cannot use this system to recover their economic damage. Under this system, complaints claiming for damages in tort may be filed to a criminal court and the judge presiding in the criminal case has the power to render a judgment ordering the defendant to pay damages after the court has found the defendant guilty.

Remission Payments for Organised Crime

When a judicial decision is made to confiscate property damaged by organised crime (eg, fraud or usury by a criminal group) as set forth in the OCPA, the prosecutor may set up a remission fund to restore the property to the victims under the procedure set forth in the Act on Issuance of Remission Payments Using Stolen and Misappropriated Property.

The plea bargaining system described in 2.7 Deferred Prosecution and 2.8 Plea Agreements was introduced in June 2018, and is the most notable development in Japanese criminal procedure in recent years. While only a few publicly reported cases have used this system so far, these cases are also noteworthy for the white-collar crime precedents they set in various other aspects.

Case of Foreign Bribery in Thailand

In July 2018, the special investigation team of the Tokyo Public Prosecutor's Office indicted three executives of a Japanese manufacturer of power generation plants for bribing public officers in Thailand. The mass media reported that the company co-operated with the investigation by public prosecutors, which started before the introduction of the plea bargaining system, and entered into a plea agreement with the prosecutor. This is the first reported case of plea bargaining in Japan, which shows that a company – and not just natural persons – can be a party to a plea agreement in which it co-operates with the investigation and indictment against its employee. At the first instance, the Tokyo District Court found all three defendants guilty of bribery. However, one of the defendants, who is a former director, contested the ruling and the Tokyo High Court at the second instance found that he was not a main offender but merely assisted in the bribery. Both parties appealed the ruling of the Tokyo High Court and this case is currently subject to the Supreme Court’s review.

Case of Securities Fraud and Other Corporate Fraud

A former CEO of a major global automobile manufacturer was arrested in November 2018 and prosecuted by the special investigation team of the Tokyo Public Prosecutor's Office for (i) false statements regarding his compensation in the annual securities reports of the company, and (ii) an aggravated breach of trust by transferring the financial obligations of his asset-holding company to the company. This is the second publicly reported case that used the Japanese plea bargaining system for investigation. The defence counsel for the former CEO argued that the plea agreement was illegal because it was used for the dismissal of the former CEO as a result of a power struggle in the company. The former CEO was detained for more than three months through a series of arrests and bail request rejections. As a result, his long-term detention drew international controversy and attention. In December 2019, the former CEO fled abroad while on bail, and the criminal proceeding has been suspended since the middle of the pre-trial arrangement procedure.

Case of Embezzlement in the Pursuit of Social Activities

A former CEO and a former store manager were convicted of embezzling approximately JPY33 million in March 2021. This is the third publicly reported case of plea bargaining in Japan. The media reported that an employee at the company who entered into an agreement with public prosecutors submitted relevant emails and other documents as well as testifying in court. The Tokyo District Court found that the testimony of the employee could not be relied upon because it was not sufficiently supported by objective evidence, and thus its credibility should be very carefully evaluated. Eventually, the court found the defendants guilty based on objective evidence. The former CEO appealed the ruling to the Tokyo high Court and the case is still pending.

Investigative Authorities

Police officers

Under the CCP, police officers are the primary investigative authority. After conducting an investigation, police officers will then send the case to the public prosecutors.

Public prosecutors

Public prosecutors can – and often actively do – investigate cases of white-collar crime by themselves or by instructing police officers. In particular, the special investigation team of the Tokyo and Osaka Public Prosecutor's Offices often deal with high-profile investigations, such as those against politicians.

Other administrative officers

Officers of some administrative agencies have investigative authority over certain white-collar crimes. For example, officers of the Japan Fair Trade Commission (JFTC) can investigate specific criminal violations of the AMA, and the Securities and Exchange Surveillance Commission (SESC) can investigate securities fraud and other violations of securities regulations. After conducting a criminal investigation, the administrative agency could file an accusation with the public prosecutors.

Each investigative authority may conduct investigations at its discretion within its authority. While there is no rule on how to allocate cases, administrative officers specialising in the particular area of white-collar crime often take the lead in an investigation.

Authority for Prosecution

Public prosecutors are basically the sole authority for the prosecution of any crime. As an exception, the Committee for the Inquest of Prosecution can bring a verdict that a certain case should be prosecuted. If the public prosecutor still does not agree to prosecute, the Committee can bring a verdict to compel prosecution of the case by a supermajority vote. In such cases, an attorney specially appointed in place of the public prosecutor will prosecute the case.

Administrative Sanction

Certain administrative authorities have the power to impose surcharges (kachokin) and other sanctions on specific violations of certain regulations. For example, the JFTC has the power to impose surcharges on “unreasonable restraint of trade” including a cartel, bid rigging affecting prices, private monopolisation and other unfair trade practices violating the AMA and the Financial Services Agency (FSA) has the power to impose a surcharge on violations of securities regulation after recommendation from the SESC.

Furthermore, in certain regulated industries, even if a surcharge or criminal sanction is not applicable, the competent regulatory authority may request the reporting of potential misconduct and revoke the licence of the relevant regulated business operators. The authority may also issue a business improvement order and other instructions to such business operators.

An investigative or administrative authority may initiate an investigation at its discretion, and there is no rule or guideline that specifically governs or clarifies the threshold for the initiation of an investigation. The investigative authority initiates investigations based on various triggers, such as a complaint, an accusation, a report from another administrative organ, or a surrender.

Warrant for Compulsory Investigation

Police officers and prosecutors, as described in 2.1 Enforcement Authorities, have authority for compulsory investigations, which include search, seizure, inspection, arrest and detention upon a warrant issued by a judge. Articles 33 and 35 of the Constitution state that no person shall be apprehended, searched or seized except upon a warrant issued by a judge, unless they are committing or have just committed an offence.

Practice of Investigation

Under the common practice of criminal investigation in Japan, when there is a need to gather documents, investigative authorities often request the relevant company to voluntarily produce documents or testimony first; companies often co-operate voluntarily with an investigation without a warrant. However, if a company declines to co-operate with an investigation, an investigative authority will conduct a search, seizure or inspection with a warrant issued by a judge. The investigative authority may choose to conduct a dawn raid first if it has concerns about the destruction or concealment of evidence by the suspects.

Interview of Employee or Officer of Company

The investigative authorities cannot compel an employee, officer or director of a company to submit to questioning, nor can they compel the company to submit such individuals, unless they are under arrest or detention. Even when they are under arrest or detention and are obliged to submit to questioning, they have the right to remain silent. The questioning can take place at an office of the authority, at the company or at any other location.

No statute or official guideline requires or suggests an internal investigation by a suspected company, nor consideration of such internal investigation in a decision to prosecute by the public prosecutor or a judgment of the court. However, in practice, an internal investigation that would help an investigation by the authority could be considered as an extenuating factor in a decision regarding prosecution or judgment. Furthermore, such an internal investigation is virtually necessary when applying to a leniency programme under the AMA or when entering into a plea agreement with the public prosecutors.

Mutual Legal Assistance

When Japanese enforcement agencies request foreign enforcement agencies to conduct investigations and report the results of the investigations, they rely on the co-operation of such foreign agencies based upon treaties or international comity with these jurisdictions.

Regarding requests by foreign authorities for investigative co-operation, the Act on International Assistance in Investigation and Other Related Matters (AIAI) provides requirements and procedures for investigative co-operation through either diplomatic channels or Interpol. The AIAI permits co-operation if all of the following requirements are satisfied:

  • the offence is not a political crime;
  • the offence would also constitute a crime under the laws of Japan if it were committed in Japan; and
  • the requesting authority submits a statement that the co-operation is indispensable.

If such requirements are satisfied, prosecutors or police officers will conduct an investigation, and the evidence collected will then be provided to the requesting authority.

In addition, the Japanese National Police Agency also co-operates with foreign authorities as a member of the International Criminal Police Organisation if the first two requirements above are satisfied.

Extradition

The Japanese government has entered into extradition treaties with the USA and Korea only. There is no publicly available information on the precedents for extradition.

Public prosecutors may initiate a criminal case by filing a written indictment (kisojo) with a competent court, which is usually located at the prefecture where the criminal conduct took place.

There are no written guidelines or standards governing the prosecutor’s decision to charge an entity or individual with a crime. Public prosecutors exercise their discretionary power to decide whether to initiate prosecution considering the characteristics of the suspect, the gravity of the offence, their situation after the offence, and other circumstances (Article 248 of the CCP).

Under the CCP, there is no statutory system of deferred prosecution agreements or non-prosecution agreements. However, the Japanese plea bargaining system described in 2.8 Plea Agreements can function as a deferred prosecution agreement or non-prosecution agreement to some extent, although it has significant differences to the plea bargaining system in the USA or other jurisdictions. Under the Japanese plea bargaining system, a company can enjoy favourable treatment such as no prosecution in exchange for its co-operation with the investigation against one or more of its corporate executives allegedly involved in the criminal conduct, which is illustrated by the first case of plea agreement, as addressed in 1.6 Recent Case Law and Latest Developments. However, for a plea bargain, a prosecutor may not consider a company’s compliance efforts or other measures to prevent recurrences, which are usually considered in plea bargains in other jurisdictions.

Co-operation in an Investigation against Another Party

A prosecutor may enter into an agreement with a suspect or a defendant, including a corporate entity, under which the prosecutor agrees to drop or reduce criminal charges, or to provide favourable treatment, only when the suspect or defendant co-operates in the investigation against other individuals or corporate entities. Plea agreements are not available merely if a suspect or defendant voluntarily decides not to contest and co-operate with the investigation of their own case. However, the prosecutor may consider a voluntary declination of a suspect or defendant when the prosecutor decides on an indictment or a recommendation of sentencing within their discretion.

Specified Crimes

Plea agreements can be used only if both the crime for which the suspect or defendant is subject to investigation or prosecution, and the crime for which the suspect or defendant is co-operating in the investigation of, fall under certain categories of crimes specified by the statutes (“specified crimes”). Such crimes include bribery, embezzlement, tax fraud, and crimes under the AMA, the Financial Instruments and Exchange Act (FIEA) or other specific laws stipulated by the CCP, and relevant government ordinances. According to the CCP, co-operation in an investigation against other suspects or defendants includes making a statement of the true facts to the investigation authorities, testifying to the true facts as a witness at court and providing evidence.

Parties Involved

A prosecutor has wide discretion over whether to enter into plea bargaining with a suspect or defendant taking into account the factors stipulated in the CCP. For example, a prosecutor will carefully examine the reliability of evidence submitted by a suspect or defendant while co-operating in the investigation and will enter into a plea agreement only if they find the evidence to be substantially useful. Since waiving the defendant’s right to defend the case could be a complex decision, the suspect or defendant must retain an attorney and a plea agreement cannot be entered without the consent of their attorney. The court has no authority to be involved with the plea bargaining in any case.

Effects of Plea Agreements

Under the CCP, if the prosecutor issues an indictment in breach of a plea agreement, such indictment must be dismissed by the court (Article 350-13).

The Companies Act (CA) imposes sanctions against fraudulent conduct by corporate executives in relation to a company’s business, in addition to those provided by the Penal Code. For example, when a director or other corporate executive commits an act in breach of their duties and causes financial damages to the company for the purpose of promoting their own interest or the interest of a third party, or inflicting damage on the company, such person is subject to imprisonment of not more than ten years and/or a fine of not more than JPY10 million (Article 960). Certain other misconduct by corporate executives that puts a company’s property at risk is also criminalised under the CA and is subject to imprisonment of not more than five years and/or a fine of not more than JPY5 million (Article 963).

The Penal Code provides that accepting, soliciting or promising to accept a bribe, or giving, offering or promising to give a bribe, in connection with the duties of Japanese public officers, is a punishable offence. Giving, offering or promising to give a bribe is subject to imprisonment with labour of not more than three years or a fine of not more than JPY2.5 million (Article 198). This penalty is not applicable to corporate entities.

The Unfair Competition Prevention Act (UCPA) provides that giving, offering or promising to give money or any other benefit to foreign public officers in order to have the officers act or refrain from acting in a particular way in relation to the duties of officers or in order to obtain a wrongful gain with regard to international commercial transactions is a punishable offence (Article 18). A violation of the UCPA by an individual is subject to imprisonment of not more than five years and/or a fine of not more than JPY5 million (Article 21). If a representative, agent or employee of a company commits such violation in the course of the company’s business, the company is subject to a fine of not more than JPY300 million (Article 22).

No statute imposes criminal or administrative sanctions on a failure to prevent the bribery of employees, nor on a failure to establish a compliance programme for that purpose. On the other hand, the CA requires the directors of a company to establish an internal control system, including a system to prevent illegal conduct; failure to establish such a system could constitute a breach of a director’s duty of care as a good manager and cause a director’s civil liability against the company.

Insider Trading

Insider trading by corporate insiders

The FIEA provides that officers, employees and agents of a listed company (including its parent company and subsidiaries) and other statutorily defined corporate insiders who know any non-public material fact pertaining to the business or other matters of a listed company (Material Facts) are prohibited from making a sale, purchase or other transfer for value, or from accepting such transfer for value of shares of the listed company, until and unless such facts have been publicly disclosed.

Material Facts are statutorily defined as:

  • decisions by those who are responsible for executing operations of a listed company to carry out certain important matters;
  • the occurrence of certain important events in a listed company;
  • the significant difference between the latest publicised forecasts of sales, current profits, net income or other account titles of a listed company and new forecasts prepared by the company; and
  • any other important matters that would have a significant influence on investors’ decisions.

Such facts regarding the subsidiaries of a listed company are also included in the definition of “Material Facts”.

Insider trading is subject to imprisonment of not more than five years and/or a fine of not more than JPY5 million (Article 197-2).

Insider trading in connection with a tender offer

The FIEA provides that purchasers of shares who know facts concerning a launch of a tender offer, and sellers of shares who know facts concerning a termination of a tender offer, are prohibited from trading shares of the listed company until and unless such facts have been publicly disclosed. The applicable criminal penalty is the same as that listed above.

Tipping

The FIEA provides that corporate insiders are prohibited from tipping a non-public Material Fact to other persons, and from recommending other persons to engage in trading for their own profit or avoidance of loss. The applicable criminal penalty is the same as that listed above.

Market Manipulation

The following are prohibited as “market manipulation” under the FIEA:

  • conducting a series of trades that mislead other investors into thinking that the trading of a certain listed security is active, with the purpose of having other investors be willing to trade such security;
  • conducting a series of trades to influence the market price of such security for the same purpose; and
  • making trades without the intention of effecting a transfer of rights (wash sales), or conspiring with others on certain trades (collusive trading) with the purpose of misleading other investors, such as leading them to believe that the trading is active.

Disseminating information in connection with the sale of securities that is inconsistent with the facts and/or has no rational basis, for the purpose of trading or influencing the price of securities, is prohibited by the FIEA as “spreading rumours”.

The applicable criminal penalty is the same as that listed above.

Banking Crime

Various fraudulent conducts by financial institutions against the regulator or customers are prohibited under the Banking Act or other relevant regulations. For example, fraudulent advertisement and providing fraudulent explanatory documents prior to contract are subject to imprisonment of not more than six months and/or a fine of not more than JPY500,000 (Article 63-2-5).

Tax evasion is punishable under the laws prescribed for each type of tax, as well as back taxes and additional penalty tax. For example, intentional evasion of corporate income tax or receiving a refund through deception or other wrongful acts, such as making false documents or creating a secret bank account, constitutes a criminal offence. There is no legal obligation for an entity to prevent tax evasion by its executives or employees in the criminal context, but a company may be subject to a criminal fine if an individual executive or employee is found guilty of a tax offence for corporate income tax and the company cannot establish that it has exercised due care to prevent the occurrence of such misconduct.

Companies Act

Under the CA, when a director or other applicable person of a company fails to prepare accounting books or record balance sheets, such person will be subject to an administrative monetary penalty (karyo) of up to JPY1 million (Article 976 of the CA). Additionally, a director (or other applicable person) who produces documents that contain false statements about material when soliciting subscribers for shares of the company will be subject to imprisonment with work for up to five years, or a fine of up to JPY5 million, or both (Article 964 of the CA). The act of illegal earnings manipulation with illegal dividends also constitutes a crime (punishable with imprisonment with work for up to five years, or a fine of up to JPY5 million, or both (Article 963 of the CA)).

Financial Instruments and Exchange Act (FIEA)

Under the FIEA, a failure to submit any required documents including certain financial statements (such as a tender offer report or an annual securities report) will be subject to a penalty, as will producing documents containing false statements about material matters, depending on the type of document (Articles 197 and 197-2 of the FIEA). Additionally, a company may be subject to a criminal fine if an individual executive or employee is found guilty of the above offences and the company cannot establish that it has exercised due care to prevent the occurrence of such misconduct.

If such a violation is committed by an officer or employee of a company, the corporation will also be subject to a fine, the amount of which is determined based on the type of violation by the individual (Article 207 of the FIEA).

Separately, such violation may be subject to an administrative order or the imposition of an administrative fine by the FSA, depending on the type of violation (Articles 172 to 172-4 of the FIEA).

Administrative Liability

The JFTC may impose cease-and-desist orders and administrative fines (surcharges, or kachokin) calculated based on a formula set forth in the AMA, which prohibits the following anti-competitive acts or practices.

  • Unreasonable restraint of trade (eg, cartels, bid rigging).
  • Private monopolisation.
  • Unfair trade practices, such as:
    1. concerted refusals to trade;
    2. other refusal to trade;
    3. price discrimination;
    4. discriminatory treatment in the terms of trade;
    5. discriminatory treatment in a trade association;
    6. an unjustly low-priced sale;
    7. unjustly high-priced purchasing;
    8. luring customers by deception;
    9. luring customers through unjust benefits;
    10. tie-in sales;
    11. exclusive dealing;
    12. restrictive trading (eg, resale price maintenance);
    13. unjust interference with the appointment of a counterparty's officers;
    14. interference with a competitor's transactions;
    15. interference with the internal operations of a competing company; and
    16. abuse of a superior bargaining position.
  • Certain mergers or other business integrations without the required notification, or the failure of such notification.

Criminal Liability

If the JFTC determines that a case is particularly serious and malicious, and has a significant effect on people’s lives, it may file a criminal complaint with the prosecutors’ office. The penalty will be a fine of up to JPY500 million for a company and imprisonment with work for up to five years and a fine of up to JPY5 million for individuals (Articles 89 and 95 of the AMA).

Misrepresentation Prohibited by the Act on Specified Commercial Transactions

The Act on Specified Commercial Transactions (ASCT) prohibits the misrepresentation of prices or payment conditions, or an intentional failure to disclose such contract terms, and a violation thereof will be subject to an instruction of business improvement (gyomu kaizen shizi), a business suspension order (gyomu teishi meirei) or a business prohibition order (gyomu kinshi meirei) as an administrative disposition (Articles 8, 8-2 and 62 of the ASCT). A person who violates the law will also be subject to a penalty of imprisonment for up to three years or a fine of up to JPY3 million (Article 70 of the ASCT).

Misleading Representations Prohibited by the Act against Unjustifiable Premiums and Misleading Representations

The Act against Unjustifiable Premiums and Misleading Representations (AUPMR) prohibits acts that could interfere with consumers’ voluntary and rational choice-making by prohibiting certain acts, including the following:

  • any representation where the quality, standard or any other particulars relating to the content of goods or services is portrayed to general consumers as being significantly superior to that of the actual goods or services, or is portrayed as being significantly superior to those of other companies that supply the same kind of or similar goods or services, contrary to fact; and
  • any representation by which price or any other trade terms of goods or services could be misunderstood by general consumers to be significantly more advantageous than the actual goods or services, or than those of other companies that supply the same kind of or similar goods or services (Article 5 of the AUPMR).

A violation of the AUPMR will be subject to an order to cease the representation (sochi meirei) as an administrative disposition (Article 7). A person who violates the law will also be subject to a surcharge (kachokin), calculated based on a formula set forth in the AUPMR.

Deceiving customers may also constitute fraud and is subject to imprisonment for up to ten years under the Penal Code (Article 246 of the Penal Code).

Cybercrimes and Computer Fraud

The Act on Prohibition of Unauthorised Computer Access prohibits the use of an identification code of another person or other information or commands to a computer via telecommunications lines in order to operate a computer in a manner that is not allowed or authorised. Such an act is subject to imprisonment for up to three years or a fine of up to JPY1 million (Articles 3 and 11).

Obtaining profits from creating a false electromagnetic record by giving false information or a wrongful command to a computer is subject to imprisonment for up to five years or a fine of up to JPY500,000 under the Penal Code (Article 161-2).

Other misconduct conducted through the internet could constitute fraud or other traditional crimes.

Protection of Company Secrets

Under the UCPA, a person who uses or discloses a trade secret acquired by the following means is subject to imprisonment for up to ten years or a fine of JPY20 million, or both (Article 21 of the UCPA):

  • an act of fraud or others (which means an act of deceiving, assaulting, or intimidating a person);
  • an act of stealing a document or a data storage medium containing a trade secret;
  • trespassing on a facility where a trade secret is kept, by making unauthorised access; or
  • violating the control of a trade secret maintained by its holder in any other way, in order to obtain a wrongful gain, or conducting similar acts.

Customs Act

Under the Customs Act, exporting or importing prohibited items, receiving an exemption from customs duty through deception or other acts of falsification, exporting or importing goods by making a false declaration or producing falsified documents, and other acts, are subject to administrative and criminal penalties.

Foreign Exchange and Foreign Trade Act

Under the Foreign Exchange and Foreign Trade Act (FEFTA), undertaking a certain transaction with the objective of providing specified technology, or exporting a specific kind of good, without obtaining permission is subject to administrative and criminal penalties.

The FEFTA also prohibits certain investments in Japanese companies by foreign investors and certain investments in foreign companies by Japanese investors without the prior approval of the governmental authority. The government can impose economic sanctions, such as asset freezing, and transactions with sanctioned parties are prohibited under the FEFTA. The violation of such requirements or prohibitions is subject to administrative and criminal penalties.

Concealment Prescribed by the Penal Code

Under the Penal Code, a person who harbours or enables the escape of another person who has either committed a crime punishable with a fine or greater punishment or has escaped from confinement, or who suppresses, damages, counterfeits or alters evidence relating to a criminal case of another person, or who uses counterfeit or altered evidence, is subject to imprisonment for up to three years or a fine of up to JPY300,000 (Articles 103 and 104). A witness who has been sworn in accordance with law and gives false testimony may be sanctioned with imprisonment with work for not less than three months but no more than ten years (Article 169).

Concealment Regarding Organised Crime

For organised crimes prescribed under the OCPA, a person who disguises facts with respect to the acquisition or disposition of criminal proceeds, or conceals criminal proceeds, or disguises facts with respect to the source of criminal proceeds, is subject to imprisonment for up to five years or a fine up to JPY3 million, or both (Article 10).

General Offences of Aiding and Abetting

A person who commits a crime jointly with another person, or induces another to commit a crime, may be treated in sentencing as a principal under the Penal Code (Articles 60 and 61). A person who aids a principal is also punishable, but the punishment imposed on such person shall be reduced from the punishment for the principal (Article 62).

Conspiracy to Commit Organised Crimes

Conspiracy to commit terrorism or other organised crimes is punishable under the OCPA if any of the persons involved in the conspiracy conducted any preparatory actions, such as the arrangement of funds or goods based on such conspiracy (Article 6-2).

Offences Related to Money Laundering

Money laundering is punishable based on the Anti-Drug Special Provisions Act and the OCPA. The former prohibits the concealment and receipt of drug crime proceeds, and the latter prohibits the following:

  • concealing or attempting to conceal facts in relation to the acquisition and disposal of the criminal proceeds, or concealing or attempting to conceal the source of criminal proceeds (Article 10);
  • accepting criminal proceeds with the knowledge thereof (Article 11); and
  • managing an enterprise through the use of criminal proceeds (Article 9) (please also see 3.11 Concealment).

Duty to Prevent Transfer of Criminal Proceeds

Under the Act on Prevention of Transfer of Criminal Proceeds, for the purpose of preventing money laundering, specified business operators, including banks and insurance companies, are subject to the following duties:

  • conducting customer identification, etc, upon conducting a transaction (Article 4);
  • preparing transaction records on customer identification data and preserving the records for seven years (Articles 6 and 7); and
  • reporting suspicious transactions (Article 8).

If a specified business operator fails to observe such duties, a competent administrative agency may order the specified business operator to take necessary measures to rectify the violation (Article 18).

Lack of Intent

For crimes requiring a specific intent, acts made without such intent may constitute a defence (for example, for the bribery of foreign public officers stipulated under the UCPA, the purpose of having the officers act or refrain from acting in a particular way must be proved).

Negligence

For the crime of negligence, the unpredictability or non-avoidability of the results constitutes a defence.

Dual Liability

Several laws prescribe a company’s dual liability clause, where a company is punished with the natural person who actually committed the crime. In such cases, the company is exempted from dual liability if it exercised due care in the appointment and supervision of the natural person (please also see 1.4 Corporate Liability and Personal Liability).

Existence of an Effective Compliance Programme

When a company has established an effective compliance programme, it may be useful to claim unpredictability and non-avoidability of the results in negligence, or the defence of dual liability as mentioned above.

No industry or sector is exempted from compliance with white-collar crime requirements in Japan. There is no de minimis exception for anti-bribery regulations (including domestic bribery punishable under the Penal Code and bribery of a foreign official under the UCPA), but gifts or gratuities within the scope of social courtesy may not be interpreted as “bribes”. The Penal Code does not have any de minimis exceptions.

Surrender (Penal Code)

The Penal Code stipulates that a criminal sanction may be reduced if the person who committed the crime surrendered themselves before being identified as a suspect by an investigative authority (Article 42). The court decides whether and by how much to reduce the penalty, taking all the circumstances of the case into account.

Leniency under the AMA

With respect to unreasonable restraint of trade under the AMA, as mentioned in 3.7 Cartels and Criminal Competition Law, the JFTC does not file an accusation to public prosecutors and does not impose surcharges against the first applicant who reported criminal activities to the JFTC before the JFTC’s investigation has commenced. The second or later applicants for leniency could be granted some reduction of the surcharge.

Plea Bargaining

As addressed in 2.8 Plea Agreements, a plea bargain could be available in the case of the voluntary disclosure of certain criminal conduct.

In addition to the above-mentioned legal systems, self-disclosure and co-operation with investigators or prosecuting authorities may be considered as mitigating factors, as may other circumstantial factors of judgement determined by investigators, prosecutors or the courts.

Under the Whistle-Blower Protection Act (WBPA), an employer shall not dismiss, demote, reduce compensation for or otherwise unfavourably treat qualified whistle-blowers under certain circumstances.

In response to criticism that whistle-blower protection is inadequate, the government amended the WBPA in June 2020, to strengthen the protection of whistle-blowers. The revised WBPA will take effect by 1 June 2022.

Expansion of Scope of Qualified Whistle-Blowers

Under the amended WBPA, qualified whistle-blowers include retired employees and corporate executives. The reporting of criminal conduct and misconduct that is subject to administrative sanctions is added to the scope of protection (Article 2).

Duty to Establish a Reporting System

Under the amended WBPA, companies with more than 300 employees must establish a reporting mechanism to receive and respond appropriately to whistle-blowing reports, and companies with 300 or fewer employees must make efforts to establish such a system (Article 11).

Duty to Protect the Confidentiality of Whistle-Blowers

The amended WBPA requests a person who is engaged in an internal investigation to protect the confidentiality of information that could identify the whistle-blower, and any violation may be subject to a criminal penalty. The violation of such statutory obligation of confidentiality is subject to criminal sanctions (Articles 12 and 21).

Exemption from Civil Liability for Damages

The amended WBPA clarifies that a whistle-blower is exempted from civil liability for damages suffered by companies due to their report (Article 7).

In criminal court proceedings, prosecutors generally bear the burden of proof and must prove guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

Under the Constitution, a defendant in criminal proceedings is presumed innocent until they are convicted.

Courts impose punishment according to their own discretion, within the range set forth in the Penal Code or other laws.

Nagashima Ohno & Tsunematsu

JP Tower, 2-7-2 Marunouchi
Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo 100-7036
Japan

+81 3 6889 7000

+81 3 6889 8000

www.noandt.com
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Trends and Developments


Authors



Nozomi Sogo Attorneys at Law is a medium-sized Japanese law firm based in Tokyo and Los Angeles, providing diverse legal services, including crisis management, white-collar criminal defence, antitrust, and various corporate and transactional matters. One of the firm's features is great relationships with the Japanese governmental agencies: three of Nozomi's attorneys were former public prosecutors in the special investigation department; Bank of Japan; Financial Services Agency; Securities and Exchange Surveillance Commission; Japan Fair Trade Commission; Consumer Affairs Agency; and Personal Information Protection Commission. Nozomi regularly handles matters relating to government investigations and compliance. The matters it has handled in the cross-border white-collar criminal area include FCPA defence, US antitrust defence and civil litigation, cross-border accounting fraud investigations, and advice for companies related to global compliance programmes and whistle-blower issues. With speed, integrity, passion and strong teamwork, the firm strives to help all its clients realise “Nozomi”, Japanese for “Hope”.

A New Era for Government Investigations

In May 2016, Japan’s Code of Criminal Procedure was amended to introduce a new plea bargaining system, which came into effect on 1 June 2018. This brought a huge change in the way criminal investigations were conducted in Japan.

Global companies doing business in Japan should also be aware of the impacts of the amendments to the Antimonopoly Act in 2019 as well as to the Whistle-Blower Protection Act in 2020.

Plea Bargaining

Under the 2016 amendments to the Code of Criminal Procedure, Japan introduced its new plea bargaining system, which took effect in June 2018. This amendment was based on the criticism that Japanese prosecutors’ investigations relied too much upon interrogation and confession. Also, there was an analysis that suggested it was becoming more difficult for the prosecutors’ office to investigate white-collar crimes because businesses and business activities had become more complex and more cross-border, and that traditional methods of investigation such as conducting raids and searches were no longer as effective as they had been in the past. These problems led to calls for a new style of government investigation, especially one that featured co-operation between the prosecutors’ office and suspects and/or defendants.

Overview of the plea bargaining system

Under the plea bargaining system, prosecutors and suspects and/or indicted defendants, with their defence counsel, will negotiate a settlement agreement. The suspects/defendants agree to co-operate with investigations related to criminal charges against third parties, and the prosecutors will reward this with advantages, such as non-prosecution agreements and reduction of charges.

It should be noted that Japan’s new plea bargaining system is different from so-called self-reporting systems in that the co-operating party (suspect/defendant) needs to provide prosecutors with information related to the investigation of a third party’s criminal conduct, not for investigations into the co-operating party’s conduct.

Crimes covered by plea bargaining

The scope of the plea bargaining system is limited to “specific crimes”, which could be categorised into three areas: (i) organised crimes, (ii) white-collar crimes and (iii) the destruction of evidence in cases related to alleged crimes included in categories (i) and (ii).

This limitation has two important consequences: first, the suspect and/or the defendant must be under investigation for these specific crimes; and secondly, the suspect and/or the defendant must co-operate by providing the prosecutor with information regarding the specific crimes of third parties. There is no requirement that the crimes committed by the co-operating suspect and/or defendant and the crimes allegedly committed by the third parties be the same.

Category (i) organised crimes include drug crimes, firearms-related crimes and other crimes typically committed by antisocial organisations like the Yakuza. Under the plea bargaining system, lower-ranked suspects/defendants in an organisation can co-operate with the prosecutor by providing information regarding the instructions given by the higher-ranking members of the criminal organisation.

As with category (i) crimes, white-collar or category (ii) crimes are specifically listed in the Code. These offences include bribery, fraud, violations of the Antimonopoly Act, embezzlement, tax law, foreign bribery and insider trading.

Category (iii) crimes include the destruction of evidence, intimidation of witnesses and harbouring criminals, in cases involving crimes listed in categories (i) and (ii).

Negotiation and agreement

The parties to the negotiation and the settlement agreement are the public prosecutor and the suspect (before indictment) and/or the defendant (after indictment). Also, it is required that defence counsel for the suspect and/or defendant is involved because it is not expected that the suspect and/or defendant can fully negotiate with the prosecutor without their counsel’s involvement.

In addition to individual suspects/defendants, corporations can use the new plea bargaining system. This is because a corporation can be a suspect or a defendant in cases where the Criminal Code provides criminal liability for a corporation based on the criminal conduct of one of its directors or employees. For example, if a director or employee of a corporation commits specific types of crimes, such as tax evasion and foreign bribery, the corporation can be criminally liable (and subject to a fine).

Types of co-operation by suspects/defendants

The suspect and/or defendant will co-operate, such as by:

  • making true statements in interviews by prosecutors and/or police officers for investigations related to criminal charges against third parties;
  • making true statements as a prosecution witness in criminal trials of third parties; or
  • submitting evidence relevant to investigations into criminal acts of third parties.

Quid pro quo obtained by the suspect/defendant through co-operation

As consideration for the suspect and/or defendant’s co-operation, the prosecutor will be able to give the following quid pro quo:

  • non-filing of indictment or criminal complaint;
  • dismissal or reduction of the criminal charges; or
  • recommendation to the court for a lighter penalty.

Judges' role in settlement agreements

A judge is not a party to the settlement agreement. In this regard, theoretically, there is a risk that a judge will not accept the quid pro quo that a prosecutor has agreed to give to a suspect/defendant. It should also be noted that there are no sentencing guidelines in Japan like the US federal sentencing guidelines. Thus, although there is some expectation that a judge will probably respect such a settlement agreement, a risk that they will not still exists to some extent.

If the agreed quid pro quo is not actually given, the suspect and/or defendant will be entitled to withdraw from the settlement agreement. In such cases, the suspect/defendant will have no obligation to co-operate with the prosecutor anymore, and the prosecutor will not be able to use the evidence given through the co-operation of the suspect/defendant.

Application of the plea bargaining system

Since the introduction of the new plea bargaining system, there have been three reported cases where this new plea bargaining system has been applied.

The first case was a foreign bribery case in February 2015 in Thailand where Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems Ltd, a joint venture company between Mitsubishi and Hitachi (MHPS), co-operated with the prosecutors’ office and reached a settlement agreement in June 2018.

In March 2015, MHPS discovered this fact through an internal report from a whistle-blower, conducted internal investigations and submitted a report to the Tokyo district prosecutors’ office in June 2015. Since that time, the company has co-operated with the prosecutors’ investigations and the prosecutors’ office made a plea bargain offer to MHPS in June 2018. According to the settlement agreement, three former executives of MHPS were indicted in July 2018 but the company itself was not indicted. Later, two of the former employees were found guilty and punished with suspended sentences at the Tokyo District Court on 1 March 2019. In the meantime, the remaining former director was sentenced to pay a fine of JPY2.5 million for aiding and abetting on 21 July 2020 at the Tokyo High Court. Both the former director and the prosecutors’ office have appealed to the Supreme Court of Japan and the case is still pending.

The second case concerns Nissan Motor Co’s chairman, Carlos Ghosn, which is still under ongoing investigations at the time of this writing (October 2021). Nissan have announced that this case began with whistle-blower information, and after conducting thorough internal investigations, the prosecutors’ office and other executives of Nissan had agreed to a plea bargain.

The third reported case was an embezzlement case committed by some executives of an apparel company GLADHAND. The special investigation department of the Tokyo district prosecutors’ office obtained the co-operation of another employee of the company who had become involved in the crime.

Importance of robust compliance programmes

Because this plea bargaining system has brought about a new style of government investigation in the area of white-collar crime, companies and executives now face the potential risk of being investigated following the use of this new plea bargaining system by lower-level employees of their own company or executives or employees of other companies. Companies doing business in Japan now need to understand that the importance of having a robust compliance programme is even more acute, especially the importance of having a well-designed and well-working internal whistle-blowing system.

Recent Changes to Japan’s Antitrust law

Revision of the Antimonopoly Act

In June of 2019, the Antimonopoly Act was amended (the 2019 Amendment), which amends came into effect on 25 December 2020. The changes included revisions to the leniency programme and adjustments to the calculation method for surcharges. In addition to the 2019 Amendment, procedures were established to protect confidential communications between attorneys and their clients. These changes will significantly impact the way companies respond to cartel cases.

Modification of the leniency programme

The 2019 Amendment made significant changes to the leniency programme through a revision of the mechanism for determining the ranking of applicants for leniency, as well of the formula for assessing surcharge based on the degree of each applicant’s co-operation with the Japan Fair Trade Commission (JFTC)'s investigation.

Under the prior version of the Antimonopoly Act, surcharge reduction rates were determined mechanically based on the order in which applications were filed. As long as applicants reported certain matters as stipulated by law, they were granted a fixed reduction of their surcharge, even if their reports were not sufficiently detailed.

To further induce co-operation with JFTC investigations, a concession scale based on the degree of participation with the investigation was adopted. For example, under the revised 2019 leniency programme, the minimum guaranteed concession rate for the second applicant before the on-site inspection is 20%, which is accompanied with potential concessions based on the degree of contribution to the investigation of up to 40%.

The foregoing amendments have elevated the importance of the leniency programme and bolstered incentives to co-operate with JFTC investigations through conducting rigorous internal investigations.

Revision of the calculation method of surcharges

The aforementioned calculation method for surcharges is based on the sales of the goods and services at issue multiplied by the length of time the cartel took place. Since the calculation method of surcharge is prescribed by the Antimonopoly Act, the JFTC is not permitted to increase or decrease penalties at its discretion. Consequently, the system has been criticised for being too rigid as it prevents authorities from adjusting surcharges to meet specific circumstances.

In order to strengthen the deterrence of fines, address various problems caused by the rigid calculation method, and to enable the imposition of surcharges tailored to each violation, the calculation method of surcharges was modified by the 2019 Amendment.

The key revisions are set out below.

Larger potential surcharge for long-standing cartels

The applicable period for calculating surcharges has been extended from a maximum of three years prior to the amendment to a maximum of ten years. Consequently, the surcharges could increase substantially where a cartel has existed for several years.

Surcharges for entire corporate groups

Before the amendment, only the proceeds of enterprises directly involved in a cartel were used as the basis for calculating surcharges. However, now the concept of calculating surcharges based on an entire corporate group has been introduced, albeit to a limited extent. For example, if company Y, a wholly owned subsidiary of company X, has engaged in a cartel, and therefore been subject to a surcharge payment order within the past ten years, the surcharge for company X will be increased by 50%. These changes are intended to foster the development of an antitrust compliance programme for entire organisations.

Abolition of reduced surcharges for entities with low profit margins

A reduced surcharge calculation had been available for wholesalers and retailers who are considered to have low profit margins, but this type of industry-specific assessment has been abolished.

Although some argue a discretionary surcharge system should be implemented in Japan, it has not been introduced to the 2019 Amendment, and the broader framework within which the JFTC calculates surcharges according to the statutory method has not been changed.

Determination procedures

With the revision of the leniency programme in the 2019 Amendment, a determination procedure was introduced to protect confidential communications between attorneys and clients in the administrative investigation procedures of the JFTC. Confidential attorney-client communications that are the subject of determination procedures are acquired by the JFTC during an on-site inspection and then returned to the operator without investigators having access to the contents thereof. This procedure was established by the rules of the JFTC, not by the Antimonopoly Act itself.

Attorney-client privilege has still not been conferred by the Japanese legal system. However, this procedural adoption of an attorney-client privilege does represent a landmark change, albeit to a limited extent, based on the characteristics of cartels.

The salient points to note regarding the determination procedure are as follows.

Limits on the use of the determination procedure

The determination procedure only applies to certain investigative procedures, such as administrative investigations of alleged cartel cases (including bid-rigging). The procedure is not designed to encompass investigations into private monopolisation, unfair trade practices such as abuse of a superior bargaining position, and criminal investigations into alleged cartel cases.

Only independent lawyers qualified under Japanese law are eligible

Foreign attorneys and in-house attorneys are not eligible. The determination procedure applies to attorneys qualified under the Japanese law, not to attorneys qualified under the foreign laws. In-house lawyers qualified under the Japanese law are also generally excluded.

Confidential communications must be handled according to strict storage guidelines. To receive protection under the determination procedure, confidential communications must be properly stored in accordance with the extremely strict rules established by the JFTC, such as:

  • the name of the file containing the confidential communications or the subject line of the e-mail should be written as "Specified communication under JFTC investigations rules", etc, (the words "privileged" or "confidential" are not allowed);
  • electronic files containing confidential communications should be stored in a specific repository, such as a legal department, and emails should be sent and received through an exclusive and specified email account; and
  • access to the contents of confidential communications is restricted to those who need to know them, such as officers and employees of a legal department.

Whistle-Blowers' Protection

In the field of white-collar criminal defence, whistle-blower protection is critically important to prevent and investigate wrongdoing at an early stage. After the US movement to protect whistle-blowers following the Enron and Worldcom cases in the early 2000s, Japan experienced a similar movement because of several serious corporate fraud cases that had been revealed by the efforts of whistle-blowers. Japan’s Whistle-Blower Protection Act was enacted in 2004 and came into effect in 2006.

After more than a decade, there have been recent discussions and changes in the whistle-blower protection area in Japan. These discussions and changes are based on corporate fraud and white-collar criminal cases where internal whistle-blowing systems did not work at all.

The Consumer Affairs Agency (CAA), the Japanese government section in charge of this area, has been reforming the whistle-blower protection regime, especially since 2016, to contribute to corporate compliance and for the protections of consumers. The following are the three main areas: (i) amendment of the internal whistle-blowing system guidelines, (ii) introduction of the self-accreditation certificate regime and (iii) amendment of the Whistle-Blower Protection Act.

Guideline amendment

The CAA amended the Guidelines for enterprises with regard to the Whistle-Blower Protection Act issued in 2005 and published amended guidelines titled “the Guidelines for enterprises with regard to maintenance and operation of internal whistle-blowing systems” in 2016 (the 2016 Guidelines).

The 2016 Guidelines substantially increased in volume, and emphasised the importance of enterprises ensuring an environment where employees are able to internally report or consult without concern. To do so, the 2016 Guidelines also request the top management to take the lead in promoting this effort. Protection of confidentiality of whistle-blowers and their reports, and prohibition of retaliation against whistle-blowers are the key elements. The 2016 Guidelines show examples of best practice taken by companies who have reached the advanced level of internal compliance whistle-blowing systems.

As explained below, the amended Whistle-Blower Protection Act, which will come into effect by June 2022, requires corporations to establish their internal compliance whistle-blowing systems, such as a contact person who receives information from whistle-blowers. According to this Act, the Consumers Affairs Agency published the new Guides (the 2021 Guides) on 20 August 2021 to provide details of the requirements, and will publish the Commentary of the 2021 Guides (the Commentary) in Autumn 2021. The 2016 Guidelines will be incorporated into the Commentary.

Self-Accreditation Certificate regime and WCMS mark

In February 2019, the CAA started the Self-Accreditation Certificate regime, in which companies self-evaluate their internal whistle-blowing systems according to the criteria issued by the registration organisation designated by the CAA. Companies who believe they satisfy the criteria submit an application to the registration organisation, and if it is confirmed that they satisfy the criteria, the companies are registered with the Self-Accreditation Certificate and allowed to use the Whistle-Blowing Compliance Management System Mark (the WCMS Mark). As of 10 September 2021, 121 companies are registered with the Self-Accreditation Certificate.

The CAA also announced that it will, at a future date, start the third-party certificate regime. Details, including the timing of the introduction of this next step, have not been decided.

Amendment of the Whistle-Blower Protection Act and new Guides

On 8 June 2020, the Japanese Diet passed a bill to amend the Whistle-Blower Protection Act. The amendment was to better protect whistle-blowers. This amended act will come into effect by June 2022.

Below is a summary of the key points of the amendment.

To further protect whistle-blowers, the definition of “whistle-blower” will be broadened from “workers” to include certain directors and officers and former workers who retired within one year.

The requirements for whistle-blowers to the relevant administrative authorities to be protected under the Whistle-Blower Protection Act will be less strict. This will make it easier to "blow the whistle" from inside companies to the relevant authorities, and companies will need to make more efforts so that their internal compliance whistle-blowing systems function better.

Companies with more than 300 employees will be required to establish internal compliance whistle-blowing systems, such as a contact person who receives information from whistle-blowers. Companies of that size will also be required to appoint those in charge of their internal compliance whistle-blowing systems functions, such as receiving information, conducting investigations, and taking preventive measures (the Persons in Charge). The Persons in Charge will have confidential obligation to protect whistle-blowers’ identification information, and breach of this obligation will be subject to criminal fine up to JPY300,000.

The 2021 Guides were issued by the Consumers Affairs Agency on 20 August 2021 to set the details of companies’ obligations before the enforcement of the amended Act. The 2021 Guides require companies to ensure the internal compliance whistle-blowing system functions to be independent from the executive members of the companies. In addition, companies are required to take measures to prevent unnecessary sharing of the whistle-blowers’ identification information. Furthermore, the 2021 Guides clarified that the Persons in Charge are defined as those to whom the whistle-blowers’ identification information is conveyed. Companies’ internal rules need to provide these matters required by the 2021 Guides. 

The Amended Act and the 2021 Guides will help whistle-blowers and reveal corporate fraud. This clearly means that the internal whistle-blowing system will be more important in Japan. Corporations doing businesses in Japan should be aware of this changing area.

Nozomi Sogo Attorneys at Law

Hulic Kojimachi Bldg. 8th floor
3-2, Kojimachi, Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo, 102-0083
Japan

+81 3 3221 2400

+81 3 3265 3860

yuki@nozomisogo.gr.jp; daito@nozomisogo.gr.jp www.nozomisogo.gr.jp
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Law and Practice

Authors



Nagashima Ohno & Tsunematsu (NO&T) is a full-service Japanese law firm with specialists in every field, more than 500 attorneys and six overseas offices in New York and Asian countries. The award-winning compliance/crisis management team at NO&T represents many of the most high-profile corporate regulatory and compliance cases related to the Japanese market or Japanese corporations. The firm has displayed particular strength in regulatory/compliance cases with a cross-border element, leveraging its capabilities to resolve issues in multiple jurisdictions. Many of NO&T’s representations have not only resolved serious crises for its clients, but have also shed light on industry-wide structural problems, often leading to legislative and policy changes. The team has grown to more than 50 lawyers, including former prosecutors, accountants, government officials, PR specialists, and other specialists from various backgrounds.

Trends and Development

Authors



Nozomi Sogo Attorneys at Law is a medium-sized Japanese law firm based in Tokyo and Los Angeles, providing diverse legal services, including crisis management, white-collar criminal defence, antitrust, and various corporate and transactional matters. One of the firm's features is great relationships with the Japanese governmental agencies: three of Nozomi's attorneys were former public prosecutors in the special investigation department; Bank of Japan; Financial Services Agency; Securities and Exchange Surveillance Commission; Japan Fair Trade Commission; Consumer Affairs Agency; and Personal Information Protection Commission. Nozomi regularly handles matters relating to government investigations and compliance. The matters it has handled in the cross-border white-collar criminal area include FCPA defence, US antitrust defence and civil litigation, cross-border accounting fraud investigations, and advice for companies related to global compliance programmes and whistle-blower issues. With speed, integrity, passion and strong teamwork, the firm strives to help all its clients realise “Nozomi”, Japanese for “Hope”.

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